Wellington


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Related to Wellington: Duke of Wellington

Wel·ling·ton

 (wĕl′ĭng-tən)
The capital of New Zealand, on an inlet of Cook Strait in extreme southern North Island. It was founded in 1840 and supplanted Auckland as capital in 1865.

Wellington

, First Duke of Title of Arthur Wellesley. Known as "the Iron Duke." 1769-1852.
British general and politician. Commander of British troops during the Peninsular War (1808-1814), he defeated Napoleon at Waterloo (1815), thus ending the Napoleonic Wars. As prime minister (1828-1830) he passed the Catholic Emancipation Act (1829).

Wellington

(ˈwɛlɪŋtən)
n
1. (Placename) an administrative district, formerly a province, of New Zealand, on SW North Island: major livestock producer in New Zealand. Capital: Wellington. Pop: 492 500 (2013 est). Area: 28 153 sq km (10 870 sq miles)
2. (Placename) the capital city of New Zealand. Its port, historically Port Nicholson, on Wellington Harbour has a car and rail ferry link between the North and South Islands; university (1899). Pop: 204 000 (2013 est)

Wellington

(ˈwɛlɪŋtən)
n
(Biography) 1st Duke of, title of Arthur Wellesley. 1769–1852, British soldier and statesman; prime minister (1828–30). He was given command of the British forces against the French in the Peninsular War (1808–14) and routed Napoleon at Waterloo (1815)

Wel•ling•ton

(ˈwɛl ɪŋ tən)

n.
1. 1st Duke of (Arthur Wellesley), 1769–1852, British general and statesman, born in Ireland: prime minister 1828–30.
2. the capital of New Zealand, on S North Island. 331,100.
3. (sometimes l.c.) Wellington boot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Wellington - British general and statesmanWellington - British general and statesman; he defeated Napoleon at Waterloo; subsequently served as Prime Minister (1769-1852)
2.Wellington - the capital of New ZealandWellington - the capital of New Zealand    
New Zealand - an independent country within the British Commonwealth; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1907; known for sheep and spectacular scenery
3.Wellington - (19th century) a man's high tasseled bootWellington - (19th century) a man's high tasseled boot
boot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
Translations
ويلنجتون
Wellington

Wellington

[ˈwelɪŋtən] NWellington m

wellington

[ˈwelɪŋtən] N (Brit) (also wellington boot) → bota f de goma

Wellington

[ˈwɛlɪŋtən] nWellington
in Wellington → à Wellington
to Wellington → à Wellington

wellington (boot)

n (Brit) → Gummistiefel m

Wellington

[ˈwɛlɪŋtən] n (city) → Wellington f
References in classic literature ?
The days that had passed since I left Wellington seemed extraordinary and unusual.
A Servant--match him!--He can see the Satellites of Jupiter.--Dick and Joe hard at it.--Doubt and Faith.--The Weighing Ceremony.--Joe and Wellington.--He gets a Half-crown.
In Wellington Street my brother met a couple of sturdy roughs who had just been rushed out of Fleet Street with still- wet newspapers and staring placards.
In a word, the whale was seized and sold, and his Grace the Duke of Wellington received the money.
I often see his footmen lounging at the back gate, and the Duke of Wellington's house is not far off.
It stands at the base of Mount Wellington, a mountain 3100 feet high, but of little picturesque beauty; from this source, however, it receives a good supply of water.
They could exchange their views concerning the Duke of Wellington, whose conduct in the Catholic Question had thrown such an entirely new light on his character; and speak slightingly of his conduct at the battle of Waterloo, which he would never have won if there hadn't been a great many Englishmen at his back, not to speak of Blucher and the Prussians, who, as Mr.
When George the Fourth was still reigning over the privacies of Windsor, when the Duke of Wellington was Prime Minister, and Mr.
You speak of Waterloo; your Wellington ought to have been conquered there, according to Napoleon; but he persevered in spite of the laws of war, and was victorious in defiance of military tactics.
A Peep-show which had originally started with the Battle of Waterloo, and had since made it every other battle of later date by altering the Duke of Wellington's nose, tempted the student of illustrated history.
He had suspicions of his father, the Duke of Wellington. Well, what did he do?
He had been an assistant master at Wellington and then at Rugby.