werewolf

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were·wolf

also wer·wolf  (wâr′wo͝olf′, wîr′-, wûr′-)
n.
A person believed to have been transformed into a wolf or to be capable of assuming the form of a wolf.

[Middle English, from Old English werewulf : wer, man; see wī-ro- in Indo-European roots + wulf, wolf; see wolf.]
Word History: The meaning wolf in werewolf is current English; the were is not. Werewulf, "werewolf," occurs only once in Old English, about the year 1000, in the laws of King Canute: "lest the madly ravenous werewolf too savagely tear or devour too much from a godly flock." The wer- or were- in wer(e)wulf means "man"; it is related to Latin vir with the same meaning, the source of virile and virility. Both the Germanic and the Latin words derive from Indo-European *wīro-, "man." Wer- also appears, though much disguised, in the word world. World is first recorded (written wiaralde) in Old English in a charter dated 832; the form worold occurs in Beowulf. The Old English forms come from Germanic *wer-ald-, "were-eld" or "man-age." The transfer of meaning from the age of humans to the place where they live has a parallel in the Latin word saeculum, "age, generation, lifetime," later "world."

werewolf

(ˈwɪəˌwʊlf; ˈwɛə-)
n, pl -wolves
(European Myth & Legend) a person fabled in folklore and superstition to have been changed into a wolf by being bewitched or said to be able to assume wolf form at will
[Old English werewulf, from wer man + wulf wolf; related to Old High German werwolf, Middle Dutch weerwolf]

were•wolf

or wer•wolf

(ˈwɛərˌwʊlf, ˈwɪər-, ˈwɜr-)

n., pl. -wolves (-ˌwʊlvz)
(in folklore) a person who has assumed the form of a wolf.
[before 1000; Middle English werwolf, Old English werwulf=wer man (c. Gothic wair, Latin vir) + wulf wolf; c. Middle Dutch weerwolf, Old High German werwolf]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.werewolf - a monster able to change appearance from human to wolf and back againwerewolf - a monster able to change appearance from human to wolf and back again
mythical creature, mythical monster - a monster renowned in folklore and myth
Translations
vlkodlak
varulv
lupfantomo
licántropolobizónhombre lobo
libahunt
ihmissusi
vukodlak
farkasembervérfarkas
varúlfur
weerwolf
wilkołak
pricolici
vlkolak
varulv

werewolf

[ˈwɪəwʊlf] N (werewolves (pl)) → hombre m lobo

werewolf

[ˈwɛərwʊlf ˈwɪərwʊlf] [werewolves] (pl) nloup-garou m

werewolf

nWerwolf m

werewolf

[ˈwɪəˌwʊlf] n (-wolves (pl)) → licantropo, lupo mannaro (fam)
References in periodicals archive ?
In a sly bit of casting, Russell Tovey, the were-wolf from BBC America's "Being Human," plays the Baskerville heir with the "hound" problem.
He also explores the categorization of the problem: wolf or were-wolf, animal or monster, the ways in which people thought about this event turned national attention on this particular set of deadly wolf attacks out of the thousands that had occurred during the period from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.
But try asking for a Margarita at the Rose and Crown in England and watch the whole pub turn and stare like a scene from "American Were-wolf in London," but without all the hair and teeth, obviously.