West Briton


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West Briton

n.
1. A native of the western part of Great Britain, especially Cornwall.
2. Offensive A native Irishman or Irishwoman whose sympathies lie toward England: "To say you'd write for a rag like that. I didn't think you were a West Briton" (James Joyce).

West British adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The West Briton newspaper published details of the inquest.
Speaking about the incident in 2007 to the West Briton, Ronald Curnow from nearby St Keverne said he remembered hearing of the tragedy.
Here, it was reported, The Morris Dancers from Lew Trenchard, led by the Misses Baring-Gould, gave great pleasure by their songs and dances.' (8) Then, on 29 August, the dancers were at a garden fete in Bude where, the West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser reported, 'Amid many attractions, perhaps the most interesting was that of the Lew Trenchard Village Troupe, in their country dances, trained by the Rev.
(9.) West Briton and Cornwall Advertiser, 2 September 1907, p.
The name of Carson's "Castle Catholic" narrator (the cutting description is Nina's) immediately recalls that of Gabriel Conroy, Joyce's "West Briton" in "The Dead," and this similarity is more than coincidence, for both narratives center on an erudite man who is so busy cataloging and over-analyzing his experience that real life and real emotion pass him by: Conway tells us in fetishistic detail about Nina's clothes and perfumes, but is ultimately unable to convey the spirit of the woman.
Flanker Phillip Gilroy scored two tries to lead Five South West Crynant to a superb 30-25 victory at Four South West Briton Ferry.
He also contacted his local newspaper, the West Briton. A reporter there, Josie Purcell, contacted journalists at The Baltimore Sun.
The man, who owns a chain of sueprmarkets in the UK and a hotel here, wrote the piece in the West Briton and Falmouth newspapers.
Moran, 'Confessions of a Converted West Briton', The Leader (1900), 25-6.
Most were educated during the war when Newport schools were blighted by a generation of incurable west Briton teachers who denigrated Welsh history and culture.
Tracing the period of rebellions in Cornwall from 1497 to 1648, West Britons: Cornish Identities and the Early Modern British State by Mark Stoyle (University of Exeter Press, [14.99 [pounds sterling]) examines those who revolted and their perceptions of themselves as a separate people.
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