West Indies Federation


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Related to West Indies Federation: CARIFTA, Association of Caribbean States

West Indies Federation

A group of ten former British colonies in the West Indies, including Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Barbados. It was established in 1958 and slated for independence in 1962 but broke up in May 1962 because of economic disagreements among the members. Most of the constituent islands and island groups gained their independence as separate nations in the 1970s and early 1980s.
References in periodicals archive ?
The West Indies Federation, a hoped-for grand political union launched in 1958, lasted only four years.
From the early efforts to create a political union which led to the establishment of the West Indies Federation (1958), to the deeper and more structured engagements of the Caribbean Free Trade Association (CARIFTA) (1965), to the more sustained measure of regional integration through a Caribbean Community (1973).
The second half centers on the period after Jamaica joined the West Indies Federation in 1958, its secession in 1961, and its achievement of independence in 1962.
Learie worked towards his country's independence and to the formation of the West Indies Federation. Nevertheless, he was not really at home in the parliamentary environment, nor, having lived for so long in England, in Trinidad.
The first was in 2012 against the West Indies Federation team.
In analyzing the "bitter controversies that raged between Adams, Manley and Williams" over the federal negotiations, Mawby explains why neither Manley nor Williams was keen on becoming prime minister of the West Indies Federation; constitutional reform at the territorial level was ahead of the federal process, and the British refused to provide realistic financial commitments to the federation.
Henry notes in passing that 1956 also marked the inauguration of the unsuccessful West Indies Federation which lasted only until 1962.
Faced with the threat of Communism in the western hemisphere and especially the rise of Fidel Castro in Cuba, successive administrations came increasingly to rely on the West Indies Federation as a bulwark against Communism.

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