West Saxon


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Related to West Saxon: Mercia

West Saxon

n.
1. The dialect of Old English used in southern England that was the chief literary dialect of England before the Norman Conquest.
2. One of the Saxons inhabiting Wessex during the centuries before the Norman Conquest.

West Saxon

adj
1. (Historical Terms) of or relating to Wessex, its inhabitants, or their dialect
2. (Peoples) of or relating to Wessex, its inhabitants, or their dialect
3. (Languages) of or relating to Wessex, its inhabitants, or their dialect
n
4. (Languages) the dialect of Old English spoken in Wessex: the chief literary dialect of Old English. See also Anglian, Kentish
5. (Historical Terms) an inhabitant of Wessex
6. (Peoples) an inhabitant of Wessex

West′ Sax′on


n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Wessex.
2. the Old English dialect of Wessex: the standard written language of Anglo-Saxon England after c850 and the medium of nearly all the literary remains of Old English.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Wessex, the West Saxons, or the dialect West Saxon.
[1350–1400; Middle English, for Old English Westseaxan Wessex; see west, Saxon]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.West Saxon - an inhabitant of Wessex
Saxon - a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Jutes to become Anglo-Saxons; dominant in England until the Norman Conquest
2.West Saxon - a literary dialect of Old English
Old English, Anglo-Saxon - English prior to about 1100
3.West Saxon - a dialect of Middle English
Middle English - English from about 1100 to 1450
References in classic literature ?
Anglo-Saxon Prose, of the West Saxon Period, tenth and eleventh centuries, beginning with King Alfred, 871-901.
Little enough, good father, little enough," said the novice, speaking English with a broad West Saxon drawl.
The West Saxon kings of the tenth century ruled in close association with the greater nobles, the most important of whom were often from junior branches of the ruling house itself.
Among the Anglo-Saxon royal pedigrees, the Mercian and West Saxon have often been quarried for their links with figures in the poem, but each departs in significant ways from the poet's central concerns (ch.
In the case of homily VII alone, Irvine cites research into the vocabulary for "pride" to suggest original composition in an Anglian dialect and subsequent transmission through West Saxon for both halves of the homily.
The oldest texts from Northumbria (seventh/eighth century) and the late West Saxon texts some three hundred years later (eleventh/twelfth century) show surprisingly little typological change of the grammatical structure of the language.
The Normans and their successors were certainly interested in presenting themselves as the legitimate heirs of their Anglo-Saxon predecessors, but favoured the recognised royal saints, especially Edmund of the East Angles, killed by the Danish army which Alfred defeated, and Edward the Confessor, the last ruler of the old West Saxon dynasty.
181) suggests, merely citing Trevisa's Polychronicon for the statement that Bede translated the Gospel according to St John into English; or he may have seen an Old English Gospel version, perhaps the late Old English West Saxon Gospels.
It represents a close /e:/ outside the West Saxon area and remains /e:/ in ME (North-West Saxon [
Earlier, as part of the entry ae, ~law', we learn that the late West Saxon variant aew tends to be restricted to sense 2 ~marriage').
We are now certainly closer to Alfredian West Saxon, the languages of the Hatton manuscript of the Cura Pastoralis, the Lauderdale Orosius and the first hands of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, than to the later AEthelwoldian variety.
It was in fact a conquest of lands never ruled by West Saxon kings before.