West Saxon


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Related to West Saxon: Mercia

West Saxon

n.
1. The dialect of Old English used in southern England that was the chief literary dialect of England before the Norman Conquest.
2. One of the Saxons inhabiting Wessex during the centuries before the Norman Conquest.

West Saxon

adj
1. (Historical Terms) of or relating to Wessex, its inhabitants, or their dialect
2. (Peoples) of or relating to Wessex, its inhabitants, or their dialect
3. (Languages) of or relating to Wessex, its inhabitants, or their dialect
n
4. (Languages) the dialect of Old English spoken in Wessex: the chief literary dialect of Old English. See also Anglian, Kentish
5. (Historical Terms) an inhabitant of Wessex
6. (Peoples) an inhabitant of Wessex

West′ Sax′on


n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Wessex.
2. the Old English dialect of Wessex: the standard written language of Anglo-Saxon England after c850 and the medium of nearly all the literary remains of Old English.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Wessex, the West Saxons, or the dialect West Saxon.
[1350–1400; Middle English, for Old English Westseaxan Wessex; see west, Saxon]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.West Saxon - an inhabitant of Wessex
Saxon - a member of a Germanic people who conquered England and merged with the Angles and Jutes to become Anglo-Saxons; dominant in England until the Norman Conquest
2.West Saxon - a literary dialect of Old English
Old English, Anglo-Saxon - English prior to about 1100
3.West Saxon - a dialect of Middle English
Middle English - English from about 1100 to 1450
References in classic literature ?
Anglo-Saxon Prose, of the West Saxon Period, tenth and eleventh centuries, beginning with King Alfred, 871-901.
"Little enough, good father, little enough," said the novice, speaking English with a broad West Saxon drawl.
Burgred and his brothers-in-law formed a combined West Saxon and Mercian army and marched to Nottingham, determined to put the loathed Viking invaders to the sword.
Stanley), where the broken form--weald--is the expected one in West Saxon. Furthermore the spelling of the first element as an- seems to emphasize its full status as an initial-stressed compound, where scribal spellings as onwald/onweald in other texts of this widely-attested word suggest that the vowel of the first element was often shortened and nasalized, perhaps disqualifying it as a compound, were it not for Alfred's or his scribes' emphatic spelling.
Neidorf asserts that some scribal error is to be expected because the scribes were so focused on their task at hand, which was not to transmit a poem with sense and meter intact but instead to copy a text word for word while modernizing and correcting it to match their contemporary West Saxon dialect.
Manfred Austen GmbH (Dresden), Slovak University of Technology (Bratislava, Slovakia), Technical University Dresden, Technical University Vienna (Austria), University of Innsbruck (Austria), and the West Saxon University of Applied Sciences, Zwickau (Germany).
It is relevant to point out, however, that many later West Saxon texts do indicate a Mercian influence.
KSUAC cooperates with the West Saxon University of Applied Sciences of Zwickau, especially the Kyrgyz-German Department of Computer Science.
Dr Tucker said: "The simplest explanation, given there was no Anglo-Saxon cemetery at Hyde Abbey, is that this bone comes from one of the members of the West Saxon royal family brought to the site."
Northumbrian, Mercian, Kentish and West Saxon were dialects of which early language?
The four Gospels were translated into Old English in the West Saxon dialect (the Wessex Gospels) in 990.
yfelu), and concludes, importantly for the present study, that regular forms prevailed in two Mercian verse texts (the Vespasian Psalter and the Vespasian Hymns) but also that irregular forms prevailed in one West Saxon prose text (AElfred's Cura Pastoralis), as well as that analogical modeling seems to have caused additional regular forms in Mercian and additional irregular forms in West Saxon.