Westinghouse brake


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Westinghouse brake

(ˈwɛstɪŋˌhaʊs)
n
(Railways) a braking system, invented by Westinghouse in 1872 and adopted by US railways, in which the brakes are held off by compressed air in the operating cylinder: controlled leakage of the air or a disruptive emergency causes the brakes to be applied. The system is used on most heavy vehicles and is replacing the vacuum system on many railways
[named after George Westinghouse (1846–1914), US inventor and manufacturer]
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Edgar Thomson that "the Chicago and North Western and Michigan Central Railroad Companies have already adopted it, and other Western Roads will probably do the same, with a view of making its use a feature in their advertising material."(71) The Burlington's Robert Harris, who soon became the most enthusiastic supporter of the Westinghouse brake among executives in the West, also recognized the public relations value of early adoption.
To assess the performance and safety of products under these extreme conditions, engineers at Westinghouse Brakes developed a hardware-in-the-loop simulator dubbed Safety+ that can test brakes under both normal operating conditions and faulty conditions by injecting software-generated corrupted tacho signals.
Westinghouse Brakes, on the other hand, needed a continuous stream of data, but this data consisted of a large number of small waveform segments.
Disposals during the year to March raised pounds 1.6 billion, including the recent sale of Westinghouse Brakes.

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