wet nurse

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wet nurse

n.
1. A woman who suckles another woman's child.
2. One who treats another with excessive care or solicitude.

wet nurse

n
a woman hired to suckle the child of another
vb (tr)
1. to act as a wet nurse to (a child)
2. informal to attend with great devotion

wet′ nurse`


n.
a woman hired to suckle another's infant.
[1610–20]

wet′-nurse`



v.t. -nursed, -nurs•ing.
1. to act as a wet nurse to (an infant).
2. to give excessive care or attention to.
[1775–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wet nurse - a woman hired to suckle a child of someone elsewet nurse - a woman hired to suckle a child of someone else
nanny, nursemaid, nurse - a woman who is the custodian of children
Translations
meyneket
dajka
doică

wet nurse

nbalia

wet nurse

n nodriza
References in periodicals archive ?
The snap was taken in the US where wet nursing is a growing phenomenon.
The picture was taken in America where wet nursing is a growing phenomenon.
The World Health Organisation said wet nursing was the second best alternative to direct breastfeeding, after expressed milk.
Wet nursing was observed among the mothers who participated in the study.
Historically, wet nursing has often been perceived by working-class or peasant women and their families as a well-paid occupation, especially when compared with the income earned by women in other jobs, such as washers, maids, cooks, or farmhands (Fildes 36; Melendez 161; Sarasua 176-178; Goodman 27-32).
This type of commodification (and exploitation) is not a new concept in relation to breast milk since we have already seen it through the commodification of breast milk in the wet nursing industry.
Northern whites were most likely to employ recent immigrants as wet nurses, and the peculiarities created by the institution of chattel slavery in the South meant that there were distinct and important differences between the experiences of wet nursing in the North and in the South:
After the headline-grabbing promotion,which included a picture of presenter Kate Garraway suckling a calf,the show looks at the return of wet nursing as the 'breast is best' debate gathers pace.
Benedict, an allegorical dialog between political powers of different courts, marital might and romanticism; and allegory as carnal knowledge as found in Venus's milk, frontispieces depicting women's ambition and wet nursing in the New World.
She relates trends in wet nursing to its perception as a kind of birth control: upper class women who did not breastfeed reproduced more readily, while wet nursing curbed lower class reproduction.
I would generally emphasize the cultural and personal aspects of breastfeeding and wet nursing, rather than the simply economic ones.