standpipe

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stand·pipe

 (stănd′pīp′)
n.
1. A large elevated vertical pipe or cylindrical tank that is filled with water to produce a desired pressure.
2. A pipe or system of pipes through which water can flow, as for the operation of fire hoses on upper floors of a building.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

standpipe

(ˈstændˌpaɪp)
n
1. (Building) a vertical pipe, open at the upper end, attached to a pipeline or tank serving to limit the pressure head to that of the height of the pipe
2. (Building) a temporary freshwater outlet installed in a street during a period when household water supplies are cut off
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

stand•pipe

(ˈstændˌpaɪp)

n.
a vertical pipe or tower into which water is pumped to obtain a required head.
[1840–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.standpipe - a vertical pipe
pipage, pipe, piping - a long tube made of metal or plastic that is used to carry water or oil or gas etc.
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

standpipe

[ˈstændpaɪp] N
1. (Tech) → columna f de alimentación
2. (in street) → fuente f provisional
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

standpipe

[ˈstændpaɪp] ncolonne f d'alimentation
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

standpipe

[ˈstændˌpaɪp] nfontanella
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995