Weygand


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Weygand

(French vɛɡɑ̃)
n
(Biography) Maxime (maksim). 1867–1965, French general; as commander in chief of the Allied armies in France (1940) he advised the French Government to surrender to Germany
References in periodicals archive ?
She visualizes her own funeral, reviewing the mourners and, more particularly, those who did not attend, including her putative son, General Weygand (406-07).
El 16 de enero de 1920, Francia y Gran Bretana levantaron el bloqueo a la Rusia sovietica y el 15 de agosto el ejercito frances del general Weygand acudio en ayuda del ejercito polaco que invadio Ucrania.
The new guestrooms will complement existing accommodation in the same contemporary-classic style, while the extended lobby area underneath the atrium and its new Lobby Lounge, along with a new pedestrian entrance, will welcome guests into the new space directly on Weygand Street.
A new pedestrian entrance will welcome guests into the new space directly on Weygand Street.
(28.) Johann August Christoph Einem, Versuch einer vollstandigen Kirchengeschichte des achtzehnten Jahrhunderts (Leipzig: Weygand, 1776), 315-16.
Le cortege presidentiel s'est rendu au quartier Sidi Mabrouk, cite Weygand, lieu qui a vu naitre Mme Dominique Ouattara.
Spanning nearly 200 hectares of prime real estate in the heart of the city, this impressive rebuilding pushed out hundreds of working-class tenants and transformed the avenues Weygand, Foch, and Allenby -- ironically still carrying the names of colonial officers who ruled parts of the Middle East -- into replicas of Fifth Avenue in New York or the Champs-Elysees in Paris.
Weygand, "Properties and applications of recycled polyurethanes," in Recycling and Recovery of Plastics, J.
The event was hosted in the salon on the lower floor of Rolex shop at 11 Weygand Street which is the only Rolex boutique in the world to offer its clients a salon experience.
It can be described that the excess phosphate required for the production of protein and nucleic acids, prolongs the growth phase of the organism and during this phase amino acids e.g., tryptophane is used for the protein synthesis (Robbers et al., 1972; Weygand and Floss, 1963).