spinor

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Related to Weyl fermion: Graphene, Buckyballs

spin·or

 (spĭn′ər)
n.
A mathematical object associated with group representations, often used in theoretical physics to model certain topological properties of space. Spinors resemble vectors but change sign (that is, they are multiplied by -1) when rotated 360 degrees.

[spin + -or (on the model of tensor vector).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spinor

(ˈspɪnə)
n
(General Physics) physics a type of mathematical object
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
spinoriel
References in periodicals archive ?
The newly discovered particle, known as a Weyl fermion, resembles a massless electron that darts around and through the material in unusual and exciting ways, physicists report online July 16 in Science.
The behavior of Weyl fermions makes tantalum arsenide a metal-like compound that shares desirable features with graphene and topological insulators, materials that have attracted a torrent of research attention over the last decade or so.
Two new particles long thought to have existed -- the pentaquark and the Weyl fermion, were experimentally confirmed in groundbreaking news out of MIT, Princeton, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
While the pentaquark can help us understand what makes up matter, the Weyl fermion could increase speed and efficiency in computing power.
TEHRAN (FNA)- An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of a new type of particle called the type-II Weyl fermion in metallic materials.
The new particle is a cousin of the Weyl fermion, one of the particles in standard quantum field theory.
Two new particles long thought to have existed -- the pentaquark and the Weyl fermion were experimentally confirmed in groundbreaking news out of MIT, Princeton, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
The Weyl fermions, which were observed in synthetic crystals of a semimetal called tantalum arsenide, exhibit some similar electronic properties to those found in the crystals used in the latest study, but lacked their chiral traits.
Zhang, "Anisotropic weyl fermions from the quasiparticle excitation spectrum of a 3D fulde-ferrell superfluid," Physical Review Letters, vol.
A VLF is composed of two different Weyl fermions as its L and R chiralities that belong to conjugate representations of the gauge group.
which is the propagator for Weyl fermions. Upon augmenting with the internal symmetry part as in (115), it has the form