whene'er

Related to whene'er: whence, whenever, Wheen, Wene, ween, wean, Wein

whene'er

(wɛnˈɛə)
adv, conj
a poetic contraction of whenever
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
there's something in the wind / Whene'er we meet a Bottom!' This focus on bodies and flatulence reveals a bawdy attitude in 1830s Scottish political poetry, an attitude which complicates critical consensus on the development of satirical poetry in the 1830s, discussed in the introduction of this article.
Whene'er my Muse does on me glance, I jingle at her (p.
I'm fond of pomp and pageantry, Of dance and youthful jollity; Am with the hero in his car, And give fresh courage for the war; Tumultuous crouds, whene'er I call, Silence each rude contentious brawl.
But the very next lines retrieve the mastery of the beginning: Oh sir, she smiled, no doubt Whene'er I passed her; but who passed without Much the same smile?
(26) For Keats, however, the swan is not the helpmeet to the aspiring immortal poet, but his natural double: "Just like that bird am I in loss of time, / Whene'er I venture on the stream of rhyme" (15-16).
Santa Filomena Whene'er a noble deed is wrought, Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, Our hearts, in glad surprise, To higher levels rise.
Speak a word of kindness, And smile whene'er you can; Your words will not fall useless, They will only win you friends.
This is the very spirit in which they deal With the whole compass of the universe: They from their native selves can send abroad Kindred mutations; for themselves create A like existence, and whene'er it dawns Created for them, catch it, or are caught By its inevitable mastery, Like angels stopped upon the wing by sound Of harmony from Heaven's remotest spheres.
Yet even today many find peace and tranquillity here: "Whene'er I walk in Ystrad Fflur / My woes, all disappear." She then meanders calmly through Cors Caron Bog, dropping five inches within seven miles.
'Whene'er the nuptial knot is duly ty'd That makes PHROSYNE DEMO's lovely bride, From ALI's hands (thy second father now) Richly the portion of the bride shall flow!' (1.
John Donne, although writing considerably earlier than Marvell, already goes beyond rhetorical or conceptual play on the apophatic to insist in his poem "Negative Love" (published 1633) that the greatest love cannot be portrayed by what can be named, or rather, cannot be portrayed because it cannot be named: I never stooped so low, as they Which on an eye, cheek, lip, can prey, Seldom to them, which soar no higher Than virtue or the mind to admire, For sense, and understanding may Know, what gives fuel to their fire: My love, though silly, is more brave, For may I miss, whene'er I crave, If I know yet what I would have.
I muse, as in a trance, whene'er The languors of thy love-deep eyes Float on to me.