Whig

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Whig

 (wĭg, hwĭg)
n.
1. A member of an 18th- and 19th-century British political party that was opposed to the Tories.
2. A supporter of the war against England during the American Revolution.
3. A 19th-century American political party formed to oppose the Democratic Party and favoring high tariffs and a loose interpretation of the Constitution.

[Probably short for Whiggamore, , a member of a body of 17th-century Scottish Presbyterian rebels.]

Whig′ger·y n.
Whig′gish adj.
Whig′gism n.

Whig

(wɪɡ)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the English political party or grouping that opposed the succession to the throne of James, Duke of York, in 1679–80 on the grounds that he was a Catholic. Standing for a limited monarchy, the Whigs represented the great aristocracy and the moneyed middle class for the next 80 years. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries the Whigs represented the desires of industrialists and Dissenters for political and social reform. The Whigs provided the core of the Liberal Party
2. (Historical Terms) (in the US) a supporter of the War of American Independence. Compare Tory
3. (Historical Terms) a member of the American political party that opposed the Democrats from about 1834 to 1855 and represented propertied and professional interests
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a conservative member of the Liberal Party in Great Britain
5. (Economics) a person who advocates and believes in an unrestricted laissez-faire economy
6. (Historical Terms) history a 17th-century Scottish Presbyterian, esp one in rebellion against the Crown
adj
(Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to Whigs
[C17: probably shortened from whiggamore, one of a group of 17th-century Scottish rebels who joined in an attack on Edinburgh known as the whiggamore raid; probably from Scottish whig to drive (of obscure origin) + more, mer, maire horse, mare1]
ˈWhiggery, ˈWhiggism n
ˈWhiggish adj
ˈWhiggishly adv
ˈWhiggishness n

Whig

(ʰwɪg, wɪg)

n.
1. a member of a political party in Great Britain (c1679–1832) that favored reforms and parliamentary authority.
2. a member of a U.S. political party (c1834–55) formed in opposition to the Democratic Party and favoring high tariffs and a weak presidency.
3. an American colonist who supported the American Revolution.
adj.
4. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Whigs.
[1635–45; earlier, a Covenanter, hence an opponent of the accession of James II; of uncertain orig., though probably in part a shortening of whiggamaire (later whiggamore), a participant in the Whiggamore Raid, a march against the royalists in Edinburgh launched by Covenanters in 1648]
Whig′gish, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Whig - a member of the political party that urged social reform in 18th and 19th century England; was the opposition party to the Tories
Englishman - a man who is a native or inhabitant of England
liberal, liberalist, progressive - a person who favors a political philosophy of progress and reform and the protection of civil liberties
2.Whig - a supporter of the American Revolution
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
3.Whig - a member of the Whig Party that existed in the United States before the American Civil War
pol, political leader, politico, politician - a person active in party politics
Translations

Whig

[wɪg] (Pol, Hist)
A. N político liberal de los siglos XVII y XVIII
B. ADJliberal

Whig

(Brit Hist)
n frühere Bezeichnung für ein Mitglied der liberalen Partei, → Whig m
adj attrWhig-; Whig governmentWhig-Regierung f
References in classic literature ?
Though he was always at heart a thorough-going Dissenter and Whig, he served all the successive governments, Whig and Tory, alike; for his character and point of view were those of the
Merchants formed the leadership of both the emerging Whig and Tory parties in the late 1670s and early 1680s.
Moreover, if the two more famous panegyrics manage occasionally to transcend Whig and Tory propaganda and should therefore carry the "primary political label" of Moderation, (53) A Hymn to Victory, as I have attempted to demonstrate, steps away from divisive party-politics even more clearly, not least in its attack on (High Tory) extremism.
As a woman "forbidden to interfere in politics," Hemans illustrates precisely how to interfere, denying the binary power of Whig and Tory establishment thought to point toward her goals of integrating and transcending party divisions.
Supposedly we should be able to "see this evolution as the cooperative achievement of all humanity, whig and tory, assisting in spite of themselves." Might we also notice here something akin to Hegel's World Spirit, which works through human fumbling to bring about happy outcomes?
The New Labour Government arguably has the worst record on undermining the freedoms of the British people of any peacetime administration since the heyday of the Chartist movement: then Whig and Tory governments built military barracks to curb dissent; today New Labour builds surveillance databases.
Thus Butterfield brings to his history of English liberty a non-ideological interpretation by concluding that both Whig and Tory now claim the fruits of the same tradition.