whim

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whim

(wĭm, hwĭm)
n.
1. A sudden or capricious idea; a fancy: "More than five hundred of these men would never see another sunset, yet a holiday atmosphere prevailed; they joked with each other as they marched, dropping out again for blackberries when the whim struck them, despite stern new orders to the contrary" (William Marvel).
2. Arbitrary thought or impulse: "I dreamed of having the golden flesh, the huge muscles of half-naked gods and goddesses who did whatever they wanted to do, ruling the universe according to their whims" (John Edgar Wideman).
3. A vertical horse-powered drum used as a hoist in a mine.
Idiom:
on a whim
Done suddenly or impulsively: "I just took a trip. Lit off at night, drove six hundred miles to see an old friend, on a whim" (Marya Hornbacher).

[Short for whim-wham, fanciful object.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

whim

(wɪm)
n
1. a sudden, passing, and often fanciful idea; impulsive or irrational thought
2. (Mining & Quarrying) a horse-drawn winch formerly used in mining to lift ore or water
[C17: from whim-wham]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

whim

(ʰwɪm, wɪm)

n.
1. a capricious notion; fancy: a party thrown on a whim.
2. capricious humor.
[1635–45; short for Middle English whim-wham, gradational compound]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whim - a sudden desire; "he bought it on an impulse"
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
2.whim - an odd or fanciful or capricious idea; "the theatrical notion of disguise is associated with disaster in his stories"; "he had a whimsy about flying to the moon"; "whimsy can be humorous to someone with time to enjoy it"
idea, thought - the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

whim

noun impulse, sudden notion, caprice, fancy, sport, urge, notion, humour, freak, craze, fad (informal), quirk, conceit, vagary, whimsy, passing thought, crotchet We decided, more or less on a whim, to sail to Morocco.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

whim

noun
An impulsive, often illogical turn of mind:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
نَزْوَه
indfaldpåfund
oikku
duttlungur
įnoris
kaprīzeuntums
geçici istekkapris

whim

[wɪm] Ncapricho m, antojo m
a passing whimun capricho pasajero, un antojo
it's just a whim of herses un capricho suyo
as the whim takes mesegún se me antoja
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

whim

hwɪm] ncaprice m
on a whim → sur un coup de tête
at the whim of sb → sur un caprice de qn
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

whim

nLaune f; her every whimjede ihrer Launen; at or on whim, at or on a whimaus Jux und Tollerei (inf); as the whim takes me etcganz nach Lust und Laune
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

whim

[wɪm] ncapriccio
a passing whim → una passione momentanea
as the whim takes me → come mi gira
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

whim

(wim) noun
a sudden desire or change of mind. I am tired of that child's whims.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Weston did not like it, was clear enough, by her passing it over as quickly as possible, and making no other comment than that "all young people would have their little whims."
I was the accomplished graduate of a dry goods store, where, by dint of ministering to the whims of fine ladies, and suiting silken hose to delicate limbs, and handling satins, ribbons, chintzes calicoes, tapes, gauze, and cambric needles, I grew up a very ladylike sort of a gentleman.
It is a whim. I have whims, and I choose to pay for them.
Quilp, however--who, beyond the gratification of his demon whims, owed Sampson some acknowledgment of the part he had played in the mourning scene of which he had been a hidden witness, marked these symptoms of uneasiness with a delight past all expression, and derived from them a secret joy which the costliest banquet could never have afforded him.
There was, as it were, a continual beginning, a preparation of the musical expression of some feeling, but it fell to pieces again directly, breaking into new musical motives, or simply nothing but the whims of the composer, exceedingly complex but disconnected sounds.
I had taken Anne to the north with me, having my whims and fancies, occasionally, about my child, and getting, at such times, jealous of Mrs.
It was not strange that he should so heartlessly have betrayed his friends' confidence, nor that he hesitated not at all to gratify a whim at the cost of another's misery.
I feel myself at the mercy of the first whim in the Vanstone direction which may come into her head -- I, the architect of her fortunes.
Her orders were indeed so liberal, that, had it been a child of her own, she could not have exceeded them; but, lest the virtuous reader may condemn her for showing too great regard to a base-born infant, to which all charity is condemned by law as irreligious, we think proper to observe that she concluded the whole with saying, "Since it was her brother's whim to adopt the little brat, she supposed little master must be treated with great tenderness.
'An idle whim, I fear, sir,' was my answer; 'or else an idle whim is going to spirit me away.
"You are a sort of monster," I added audaciously, "a Caliban who has pondered Setebos, and who acts as you act, in idle moments, by whim and fancy."
"Supposing," she answered, still looking at him steadily, "supposing I were to say that I had no object in coming here at all - that it was merely a whim? What should you say then?"