Whiskin

Whisk´in


n.1.A shallow drinking bowl.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trainor, L.J., Marie, C., Gerry, D., Whiskin, E., Unrau, A.
Whiskin, "Socially transmitted food preferences can be used to study long-term memory in rats," Animal Learning & Behavior, vol.
Preference tests have been used as a methodological option to determine the environmental parameters, such as temperature (KRAUSE et al., 1998), food (GALEF; WHISKIN, 2001) and type of substrate (DAWKINS, 1998).
First with the chequebook was local man Victor Vaughan of Whiskin Precision Engineering.
Melina: Department of Economics, Social Sciences Building, City University London, Whiskin Street, London, EC1R 0JD, UK.
Through social transmission, animals learn what flavors to like or dislike (Galef, Whiskin, & Bielavska, 1997).
(10.) Trainor, Laurel J., Celine Marie, David Gerry, Elaine Whiskin, and Andrea Unrau (2012), "Becoming Musically Enculturated: Effects of Music Classes for Infants on Brain and Behavior," Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1252: 129-138.
The hosts led 2-0 after goals from Mo Haskin (18mins) and Jamie Whiskin (50) but Evesham replied through Robbie Ager's first goal for the club with 15 minutes left and they nearly snatched a point when Danny Lennon's strike hit the woodwork.
The three points look secured five minutes into the second half when Jamie Whiskin doubled the home side's lead when he converted a cross from Darren Wheeler.
Ac mae tinc o hiraeth yn ei lais wrth gofio'r diwrnod hwnnw: "Roedd hi'n tywallt y glaw, a doedd neb yno i gofnodi'r fordaith olaf drist honno ond yr hanesydd lleol, Stuart Whiskin, a minnau.