catworm

(redirected from White worm)

catworm

(ˈkætˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) an active carnivorous polychaete worm, Nephthys hombergi, that is about 10cm (4in) long, having a pearly sheen to its body: often dug for bait. Also called: white worm or white cat
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References in classic literature ?
In Mercian tongue it was 'The Lair of the White Worm.
But, thou white worm of the dark, I tell thee there is neither king nor city
Ryan began to notice trout swimming very close to the surface, so he switched to an Olive & White worm fished about a foot down and netted 7 fish in three hours, making his trip well worthwhile.
Works discussed include Alan HollinghurstAEs The Line Beauty, Matthew KnealeAEs Sweet Thames, Ken RussellAEs The Lair of the White Worm, and Angela CarterAEs Nights at the Circus.
In this study, for the first time, effects of live food on platy (Xiphophorus maculatus Gunther, 1866), were investigated by using frozen white worm (Enchytraeus sp.
Eyes, The Lair of the White Worm, Rab C Nesbitt, Ruth Rendell Mysteries, Agatha Christie's Poirot and the mini series Selling Hitler.
However, Stoker's interest in the Gothic mode extended throughout his career and beyond works such as Dracula, Te Jewel of Seven Stars (1903, revised 1912), and Te Lair of the White Worm (1911) which attract the most attention in this regard.
Lawrence novels, including 1969's "Women in Love," 1989's "The Rainbow" and 1993's "Lady Chatterley" for TV, as well as Oscar Wilde's "Salome's Last Dance" and Brain Stokers "The Lair of the White Worm," both in 1988), alongside period dramas about writers and performers (1977's "Valentino," 1986's "Gothic") and biopics about the classical composers he adored (1970's "The Music Lovers," 1974's "Mahler" and 1975's "Lisztomania").
Russell, whose discussion with Plender revolves largely around the role of the artist, moved easily at the end of the 1960s from producing energetic arts biopics for the BBC to making idiosyncratic versions of gothic classics, such as his grandiloquent 1988 adaptation of The Lair of the White Worm.
I don't see the relevance of Wright's discussion of several late novels by Bram Stoker--The Jewel of Seven Stars, The Lady of the Shroud, and The Lair of the White Worm--since none of them are about either Ireland or India, and The Lair of the White Worm, written when Stoker was losing his mind, is incoherent in either of its surviving versions.
Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories, in which the editors have collected many of Stoker's more troubling tales including the once derided The Lair of the White Worm, provides a valuable starting point for retheorizing Stoker's accomplishment.