whitecoat

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whitecoat

(ˈwaɪtˌkəʊt)
n
a person, such as a scientist or doctor, who wears a white coat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1970s, Ifaw began to mobilise public opinion against the annual hunt of baby harp seals (known as "whitecoats") off Canada's east coast.
The Marquis of Newcastle and his famous brigade, or "tercio", of "whitecoats" initially defeated northern parliamentarians under Lord Fairfax and his son Sir Thomas, (soon to be commander in chief on the New Model Army).
Here we find Safe, an underground community that has evolved to provide refuge to those who have been labelled as Sick, Freak or Beast, to save them from the Whitecoats and to offer all the comforts of a home.
More is known about this animal than most others because of its economic importance to modern Newfoundlanders and because of the political controversy surrounding the harvest of its infant whitecoats. Here we see how an archaeological problem--the need to determine site seasonality--has stimulated advanced studies of osteology and has brought concordance between stages of osteological development and folk taxonomy, although it has not yet provided simple, reliable methods for precise aging, seasonality, or species identification.
While "whitecoats" are not to be hunted until they have developed some black on their coats, and have been subject to this protection since 1987, the rule was impossible to enforce.
A mother is hunting for her pup in the vast sea of "whitecoats."
However, a short while agothoughts of a point at Fratton Parkgained through a shut-out at theback would have been met byfriendly but firm guys in whitecoats ushering you towards awaiting ambulance.
Also highlighted was the fact that the killing of harp seal pups (whitecoats) has been banned in Canada since 1987, under penalty of severe fines, despite the fact that images of them continue to be used in publicity material produced by animal rights associations.
During trials in the US state of Georgia, the whitecoats delivered a series of 96 electric shocks into the feet of brave volunteers.
Many will remember the high profile campaigns in the '70s and '80s which led effectively to a ban on the killing of baby seals, but this applied only to harp seals, known as "whitecoats", and hooded seals, known as "bluebacks".
But this applied only to harp seals known as 'whitecoats' and hooded seals known as 'bluebacks'.
Many will remember the high-profile campaigns in the 70s and 80s which led effectively to a ban on the killing of baby seals, but this applied only to harp seals known as whitecoats and hooded seals known as bluebacks.