Whitman


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Whit·man

(wĭt′mən, hwĭt′-), Marcus 1802-1847.
American frontier missionary and physician who with his wife Narcissa Prentiss (1808-1847) established a missionary post in the Oregon region (1836). The killing of the Whitmans and other members of their mission by Cayuse Indians in 1847 led to a period of military conflict between US forces and Native Americans in the Northwest.

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Walt Whitman

Whit·man

(wĭt′mən, hwĭt′-), Walter Known as "Walt." 1819-1892.
American poet whose Leaves of Grass (first published 1855), written in long lines of free verse, celebrates the self, death as a process of life, universal brotherhood, and the greatness of democracy and the United States.

Whitman

(ˈwɪtmən)
n
(Biography) Walt(er). 1819–92, US poet, whose life's work is collected in Leaves of Grass (1855 and subsequent enlarged editions). His poems celebrate existence and the multiple elements that make up a democratic society

Whit•man

(ˈʰwɪt mən, ˈwɪt-)

n.
Walt(er), 1819–92, U.S. poet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Whitman - United States poet who celebrated the greatness of America (1819-1892)Whitman - United States poet who celebrated the greatness of America (1819-1892)
2.Whitman - United States frontier missionary who established a post in Oregon where Christianity and schooling and medicine were available to Native Americans (1802-1847)Whitman - United States frontier missionary who established a post in Oregon where Christianity and schooling and medicine were available to Native Americans (1802-1847)
References in classic literature ?
This is what I find the fatal defect of our American Ossian, Walt Whitman, whose way is where artistic madness lies.
OF the trinity of American authors whose births made the year 1819 a notable one in our literary history,--Lowell, Whitman, and Melville,--it is interesting to observe that the two latter were both descended, on the fathers' and mothers' sides respectively, from have families of British New England and Dutch New York extraction.
One might almost sympathize with Sarah Helen Whitman, who, confessing to a half faith in the old superstition of the significance of anagrams, found, in the transposed letters of Edgar Poe's name, the words "a God-peer." His mind, she says, was indeed a "Haunted Palace," echoing to the footfalls of angels and demons.
Gill, Eugene Didier, Sarah Helen Whitman and others these scandals have been dispelled and Poe is seen as he actually was-not as a man without failings, it is true, but as the finest and most original genius in American letters.
And how inexpressibly sad it was to hear him prattling on of the ideal life, of socialism, of Walt Whitman and what not,--all the dear old quackeries,--while I was already settling down comfortably to a conservative middle age.
Two things are incompossible when the world of being has scope enough for one of them, but not enough for both -- as Walt Whitman's poetry and God's mercy to man.
In 1844, at age twenty-five, Walt Whitman read an article by perhaps the preeminent poet, essayist, and intellectual of his day, Ralph Waldo Emerson.
Kummings was, in the Whitman community, a scholar's scholar.
Summary: Hewlett Packard Enterprise CEO Meg Whitman has distanced herself from the prospect of becoming ride-hailing firm Uber's next CEO in …
Mae Whitman will return to NBC three years after "Parenthood" was canceled.
"I will vote for Hillary, I will talk to my Republican friends about helping her, and I will donate to her campaign and try to raise money for her," Meg Whitman told The New York Times Tuesday.
Jennifer Schuessler at the New York Times has just now, on April 29, reported the discovery of a major unknown work by Walt Whitman, Manly Health and Training, written in 1858though some people may object to calling the unknown work "major," given that Manly Health and Training represents hack journalism of a semi-reputable and decidedly minor sort.