whole note

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Related to Whole notes: semibreves

whole note

n. Music
A note having the value of four beats in common time.

whole note

n
(Music, other) US and Canadian a note, now the longest in common use, having a time value that may be divided by any power of 2 to give all other notes. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): semibreve

whole′ note`



n.
a musical note equivalent in value to four quarter notes.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whole note - a musical note having the longest time value (equal to four beats in common time)whole note - a musical note having the longest time value (equal to four beats in common time)
musical note, note, tone - a notation representing the pitch and duration of a musical sound; "the singer held the note too long"
Translations

whole note

n (Am) (Mus) → semibreve f
References in periodicals archive ?
The canaries are eighth notes, the bluebirds are quarter notes, the green parakeets are half notes, and those big fat robins are whole notes.
Or the father who closed his eyes and swayed, ever so gently, to the whole notes of a love song, and who, next morning, blew fluttery kisses to his two little girls?
reversed note stems and whole notes in the middle of the bar), most of which have nothing to do with cello notation per se.
In unison, they turn their heads to the left, where six soap bubbles arrange themselves against a stone block wall like whole notes on a staff.
Most singers are limited to a range of an octave or two--maybe 16 consecutive whole notes, max.
The major and melodic minor scales are printed as whole notes, eighth and sixteenth notes, tetrachords, modes and in thirds.
Learning about whole notes and quarter notes, for example, helps students better underst ``I think there's a lot of kids who love music and have an aptitude for it and just don't know it yet,'' said Suzanne Shisley, a teacher.
I find, on the contrary, that the juxtaposition is wonderfully clear to the ear, especially because of the suddenness of the whole notes in the texture, and especially if the cellist, violist, and second violinist connect the whole notes into a line in the way that good chamber music players know to do.
Scales progress from whole notes, to eighths, to sixteenths.
The cell for whole notes is also the cell for sixteenth notes.