whole life insurance

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whole life insurance

n.
Insurance that provides death protection for the insured's entire lifetime.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whole life insurance - insurance on the life of the insured for a fixed amount at a definite premium that is paid each year in the same amount during the entire lifetime of the insured
life assurance, life insurance - insurance paid to named beneficiaries when the insured person dies; "in England they call life insurance life assurance"
References in periodicals archive ?
But yesterday an appeal at the European Court of Human Rights against his whole-life prison sentence was rejected.
TRIPLE killer Arthur Hutchinson has lost his challenge at the European Court of Human Rights against his whole-life prison sentence.
EUROPEAN judges have ruled whole-life sentences for Britain's most notorious killers are compatible with European law and do not breach their human rights.
In a previous judgement in July 2013 the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) had ruled UK domestic law was unclear on whether those serving whole-life terms can be released.
But his appeal was overturned by judges at the court in Strasbourg who agreed the law did not violate his rights as, technically, the Justice Secretary can still review whole-life terms.
ONE of the two murderers of soldier Lee Rigby, who was from Middleton, Greater Manchester, has launched an appeal against his whole-life prison term, the Judicial Oce conrmed.
A MUM whose 22-year-old son was killed in a brutal knife attack has welcomed a court's decision to maintain whole-life sentences for murderers.
SERIAL killer Peter Tobin won't be able to challenge his whole-life prison sentence after a ruling yesterday.
Backing the use of "life-means-life" orders, a panel of five judges increased the "unduly lenient" 40-year minimum being served by killer Ian McLoughlin, who murdered a man while on day release, to a whole-life term.
The Court of Appeal made the judgment in cases bought by two murders and a rapist who claimed whole-life orders were inappropriate.
They had claimed whole-life tariffs condemning prisoners to die in jail amounted to "inhuman or degrading treatment".
Lord Judge said: "Each of the attempted murders, as well as each of the murder offences, taken on its own was a dreadful crime of utmost brutality: taking all the offences together, we have been considering an accumulation of criminality of exceptional magnitude which went far beyond the legislative criteria for a whole-life order.