whole-grain


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whole′-grain′



adj.
of or being natural or unprocessed grain containing the germ and bran.
[1955–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

whole-grain

[ˈhəʊlgreɪn] ADJ [bread, cereal] → integral
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Look for the word "whole." When buying whole-wheat or whole-grain bread, "beware of buzzwords and manufacturer claims on the bread label," says Rachel Lustgarten, a registered dietitian at Weill Cornell Medicine.
Women with the highest intake of whole-grain foods [about 1 1/2 servings per day] had the lowest risk of premenopausal breast cancer.
The participants also indicated what kinds of whole-grain products they consumed, such as rye and other whole-grain breads, oatmeal porridge, and muesli.
Flour that includes whole-grain components contains more healthy fiber than traditionally milled white flours.
Monday -- Whole-grain grilled chicken wrap, romaine lettuce/tomato, Spanish brown rice, corn, tropical fruit, milk choice
A human nutrition study reaffirms the health benefits of substituting refined-grain products like white bread with whole-grain foods like whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, barley, rye, and brown or wild rice.
When it comes to your dietary choices, it's a good idea to be a purist and ride the whole-grain train.
Researchers noted that the study used commercial whole-grain flour products and suggested that using whole-grain kernels might produce an even greater benefit.
The take-home message: Replacing white bread, white rice, white pasta, and other refined grains with whole grains--such as whole-wheat bread, brown rice, whole-grain pasta, barley, and oats/oatmeal--may help promote weight control.
Most gluten-free breads have more potato, corn, or tapioca starch than whole-grain (usually brown rice) flour.
But they lack the nutritional clout of their whole-grain cousins, even when they have been fortified with added vitamins and minerals.