whooping crane

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whooping crane

n.
A large North American crane (Grus americana) having predominantly white plumage and a loud trumpeting cry.

whooping crane

n
(Animals) a rare North American crane, Grus americana, having a white plumage with black wings and a red naked face

whoop′ing crane′


n.
a white North American crane, Grus americana, having a loud, whooping call.
[1720–30, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whooping crane - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting callwhooping crane - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting call
crane - large long-necked wading bird of marshes and plains in many parts of the world
genus Grus, Grus - type genus of the Gruidae: typical cranes
References in periodicals archive ?
The reintroduction of whooping cranes to the White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area in Louisiana marks the fourth reintroduction of the species into the wild, and the only reintroduction of the species into an area where it historically occurred.
Operation Migration awaits FAA ruling on LSA pilots Operation Migration, an organization that guides whooping cranes with ultralight aircraft, may have run afoul of Federal Aviation Administration regulations.
Whooping Crane (Grus americana) The successful effort to reintroduce migratory whooping cranes to the eastern United States continued as 20 of the reintroduced whoopers migrated back to Wisconsin on their own from Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Florida during the spring of 2003.
It infected at least 186 wild and captive bird species, including pigeons, house sparrows, chickens, cardinals, mockingbirds, mallards, parakeets, peacocks, macaws, flamingos, bald eagles, and whooping cranes. The virus had also turned up in 17 other vertebrate species, including cats, dogs, chipmunks, striped skunks, bats, and alpacas.
The phenomenon includes the federally endangered whooping cranes and hundreds of other types of bird.
Whooping cranes - at 1.5m high, the tallest birds in North America - face extinction unless they breed soon.
Ultralight-aircraft enthusiast Kent Clegg and a contingent of young sandhill and whooping cranes were riding a thermal over a Colorado plateau last October when a golden eagle, drifting at 10,000 feet on the same bubble of hot air, folded its wings, homed in on one of the cranes like a missile--and missed!
Some of them are whooping cranes, red wolves, Florida panther s, mission blue butterflies, and green pitcher plants.
The visitors in this case were migrating whooping cranes, two of only about 600 such birds that exist today.
The only remaining wild population of whooping cranes breeds in Canada and winters in the United States.