whooping crane

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whooping crane

n.
A large North American crane (Grus americana) having predominantly white plumage and a loud trumpeting cry.

whooping crane

n
(Animals) a rare North American crane, Grus americana, having a white plumage with black wings and a red naked face

whoop′ing crane′


n.
a white North American crane, Grus americana, having a loud, whooping call.
[1720–30, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whooping crane - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting callwhooping crane - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting call
crane - large long-necked wading bird of marshes and plains in many parts of the world
genus Grus, Grus - type genus of the Gruidae: typical cranes
References in periodicals archive ?
Festival attendees will have the opportunity to take guided boat tours to the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge to view the world's last naturally-occurring population of Whooping Cranes on their wintering grounds.
The only way that whooping cranes can reproduce is if they first do an exhausting mating dance together, and because Tex was imprinted on humans, she did not know enough to trust another whooping crane mate to dance with him at first.
Roosevelt to benefit waterfowl migrating along the Central Flyway, although whooping cranes had been previously known to spend winters there for generations.
Stepping momentarily away from the clinical trials setting, a case study entitled, "The effects of anticoagulant choice and sample processing time on hematologic values of juvenile whooping cranes," from 20101 describes the collection of blood from these birds and the dependence of test results on a number of factors.
But if we stop trying, the chances are that pretty soon we'll end up with a world where there are no tigers or elephants, or sawfishes or whooping cranes, or albatrosses or ground iguanas.
Wood Buffalo National Park in northwestern Canada contains North America's largest wild bison population and a critical nesting habitat for whooping cranes.
Chavez-Ramirez et al (1996) briefly mention whooping cranes in Texas scavenging snakes and lizards at recent burns.
With particular focus on sandhill and whooping cranes, and shorter chapters on the world's thirteen other crane species, Johnsgard and Mangelsen showcase social behavior, migratory habits, anatomy, natural habitats, and fascinating crane lore.
Plan (HCP) for whooping cranes and apply for an incidental take permit
Abstract: Protein electrophoresis of serum samples from endangered, wild whooping cranes (Grus americana) was performed to help assess the health of the only self-sustaining, migratory population in North America.
Since 2001, Operation Migration has played a key role in the reintroduction of endangered whooping cranes into eastern North America.