Whorf


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Whorf

 (wôrf, hwôrf), Benjamin Lee 1897-1941.
American linguist who developed what came to be known as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in collaboration with his teacher Edward Sapir.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Whorf

(wɔːf)
n
(Biography) Benjamin Lee. 1897–1943, US linguist, who argued that human language determines perception. See also Sapir-Whorf hypothesis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Whorf

(ʰwɔrf, wɔrf)

n.
Benjamin Lee, 1897–1941, U.S. linguist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
El libro documenta durante este periodo lecturas de Weber, Russell, Quine, Carnap, Reichenbach, Fleck, Koffka y Whorf, mas el primer encuentro con Popper en 1950.
Finally Cali adds the work of Benjamin Lee Whorf, the semi-amateur linguist whose studies of Native American languages led to the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, which claims that the language somebody speaks shapes that person's basic understanding of the world, often referred to as the linguistic relativity hypothesis.
Whorf's hypothesis maintains that the structure of a language (and I would include its implicit infrastructures) influences the way in which one perceives and interacts with the world.
The latter conclusion goes in line with the theory of linguistic relativity formulated by the American researchers Franz Boas, Edward Sapir and most significantly by Benjamin Lee Whorf (Marina 2003) and known as "Sapir-Whorf hypothesis." Stuart Chase, in his forewor to Whorf 's "Language, thought, and reality" summarizes the theory of the latter as follows: "Speakers of different languages see the Cosmos differently, evaluate it differently, sometimes not by much, sometimes widely.
He also includes a detailed survey of modern scholars and their interpretations: Ann Moss, Richard Waswo, Erika Rummel, Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf. The humanists Vives and Valla both adhered to this linguistic determinism, and so do many modern scholars to this very day.
Since it is intended as a contribution to Whorf's (1956) concept of Standard Average European (SAE), extensively studied in recent decades, primarily within the Eurotyp project, the first sections discuss various methodological problems and theoretical approaches to the idea of SAE, including those by Haspelmath (1998, 2001), van der Auwera (1998a, 1998b) and Heine and Kuteva (2006).