weird

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Related to Wierd: Weird, wired

weird

involving or suggesting the supernatural: a weird glowing object in the sky; fantastic; bizarre: That’s a weird costume you are wearing.
Not to be confused with:
wired – equipped with wires; made of wire; consisting of or made of wires: a wired barrier; connected electronically to computer networks; a feeling of excitement or anticipation; edgy: You’re certainly wired today.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

weird

 (wîrd)
adj. weird·er, weird·est
1. Strikingly odd or unusual, especially in an unsettling way; strange: He lives in a weird old house on a dark street. Your neighbor is said to be a little weird. I felt a little weird after drinking that tea.
2. Suggestive of the supernatural: weird stories about ghosts.
3. Archaic Of or relating to fate or the Fates.
n. Archaic
1. Fate; destiny.
2. One's assigned lot or fortune, especially when evil.
tr. & intr.v. weird·ed, weird·ing, weirds
Slang To experience or cause to experience an odd, unusual, and sometimes uneasy sensation. Often used with out.

[Middle English werd, wird, fate (often in the pl. wirdes, the Fates), from Old English wyrd; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

weird′ly adv.
weird′ness n.
Synonyms: weird, eerie, uncanny, unearthly
These adjectives refer to what is of a mysteriously strange, usually frightening nature. Weird may suggest the operation of supernatural influences, or merely the odd or unusual: "Nameless voices—weird sounds that awake in a Southern forest at twilight's approach,—were crying a sinister welcome to the settling gloom" (Kate Chopin)."The platypus ... seemed so weird when first discovered that a specimen sent to a museum was thought to be a hoax: bits of mammal and bits of bird stitched together" (Richard Dawkins).
Something eerie inspires fear or uneasiness and implies a sinister influence: "His white countenance was rendered eerie by the redness of the sagging lids below his eyes" (John Updike).
Uncanny refers to what is impossible to explain or accept: "My mother had an uncanny ability to see right through to my motives. At the time I wondered if she had ESP" (Porter Shreve).
Something unearthly seems so strange and unnatural as to come from or belong to another world: "The joy of having escaped death made the unearthly ruins of Hamburg seem more like a smoldering paradise than the purgatory other people thought our once lovely city had become" (Marione Ingram).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

weird

(wɪəd)
adj
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) suggestive of or relating to the supernatural; eerie
2. strange or bizarre
3. (Classical Myth & Legend) archaic of or relating to fate or the Fates
n
4. fate or destiny
5. (Classical Myth & Legend) one of the Fates
6. dree one's weird Scot See dree
vb
(tr) Scot to destine or ordain by fate; predict
[Old English (ge)wyrd destiny; related to weorthan to become, Old Norse urthr bane, Old Saxon wurd; see worth2]
ˈweirdly adv
ˈweirdness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

weird

(wɪərd)

adj. -er, -est,
n. adj.
1. involving or suggesting the supernatural; unearthly or uncanny: a weird sound.
2. strange; unusual; peculiar: a weird costume.
3. Archaic. concerned with or controlling fate or destiny.
n. Chiefly Scot.
4. fate; destiny.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English (northern form of wird), Old English wyrd; akin to worth2; (adj.) Middle English, orig. attributive n. in phrase werde sisters the Fates (popularized as appellation of the witches in Macbeth)]
weird′ly, adv.
weird′ness, n.
syn: weird, eerie, uncanny refer to that which is mysterious and apparently outside natural law. weird suggests the intervention of supernatural influences in human affairs: weird doings in the haunted house; a weird coincidence. eerie refers to something ghostly that makes one's flesh creep: eerie moans from a deserted house. uncanny refers to an extraordinary or remarkable thing that seems to defy the laws established by experience: an uncanny ability to recall numbers.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

weird


Past participle: weirded
Gerund: weirding

Imperative
weird
weird
Present
I weird
you weird
he/she/it weirds
we weird
you weird
they weird
Preterite
I weirded
you weirded
he/she/it weirded
we weirded
you weirded
they weirded
Present Continuous
I am weirding
you are weirding
he/she/it is weirding
we are weirding
you are weirding
they are weirding
Present Perfect
I have weirded
you have weirded
he/she/it has weirded
we have weirded
you have weirded
they have weirded
Past Continuous
I was weirding
you were weirding
he/she/it was weirding
we were weirding
you were weirding
they were weirding
Past Perfect
I had weirded
you had weirded
he/she/it had weirded
we had weirded
you had weirded
they had weirded
Future
I will weird
you will weird
he/she/it will weird
we will weird
you will weird
they will weird
Future Perfect
I will have weirded
you will have weirded
he/she/it will have weirded
we will have weirded
you will have weirded
they will have weirded
Future Continuous
I will be weirding
you will be weirding
he/she/it will be weirding
we will be weirding
you will be weirding
they will be weirding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been weirding
you have been weirding
he/she/it has been weirding
we have been weirding
you have been weirding
they have been weirding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been weirding
you will have been weirding
he/she/it will have been weirding
we will have been weirding
you will have been weirding
they will have been weirding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been weirding
you had been weirding
he/she/it had been weirding
we had been weirding
you had been weirding
they had been weirding
Conditional
I would weird
you would weird
he/she/it would weird
we would weird
you would weird
they would weird
Past Conditional
I would have weirded
you would have weirded
he/she/it would have weirded
we would have weirded
you would have weirded
they would have weirded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Weird - fate personified; any one of the three Weird Sisters
Anglo-Saxon deity - (Anglo-Saxon mythology) a deity worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons
Adj.1.weird - suggesting the operation of supernatural influencesweird - suggesting the operation of supernatural influences; "an eldritch screech"; "the three weird sisters"; "stumps...had uncanny shapes as of monstrous creatures"- John Galsworthy; "an unearthly light"; "he could hear the unearthly scream of some curlew piercing the din"- Henry Kingsley
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"
2.weird - strikingly odd or unusual; "some trick of the moonlight; some weird effect of shadow"- Bram Stoker
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

weird

adjective
1. strange, odd, unusual, bizarre, ghostly, mysterious, queer, unearthly, eerie, grotesque, supernatural, unnatural, far-out (slang), uncanny, spooky (informal), creepy (informal), eldritch (poetic) I had such a weird dream last night.
strange natural, normal, regular, usual, ordinary, typical, mundane
2. bizarre, odd, strange, unusual, queer, grotesque, unnatural, creepy (informal), outlandish, freakish I don't like that guy - he's really weird.
bizarre common, natural, normal, regular, usual, ordinary, typical
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

weird

adjective
1. Of a mysteriously strange and usually frightening nature:
Informal: spooky.
3. Causing puzzlement; perplexing:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَجِيبغَريب
podivný
underlig
omituinen
čudan
annarlegur, dularfullur
変な
별난
dīvainsmistisks
čuden
konstig
แปลกประหลาด
kỳ dị

weird

[wɪəd] ADJ (weirder (compar) (weirdest (superl))) → raro, extraño
the weird thing is thatlo raro es que ...
all sorts of weird and wonderful thingstodo tipo de cosas extraordinarias
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

weird

[ˈwɪərd] adj [person, appearance] → bizarre; [experience, coincidence, feeling] → bizarre
It felt weird going back to Liverpool → Cela faisait bizarre de revenir à Liverpool.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

weird

adj (+er) (= uncanny)unheimlich; (inf: = odd) → seltsam
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

weird

[wɪəd] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) → strano/a, bizzarro/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

weird

(wiəd) adjective
odd or very strange. a weird story; She wears weird clothes.
ˈweirdly adverb
ˈweirdness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

weird

عَجِيب podivný underlig seltsam αλλόκοτος extraño omituinen bizarre čudan bizzarro 変な 별난 vreemd underlig dziwny esquisito сверхъестественный konstig แปลกประหลาด acayip kỳ dị 怪异的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
"It was really freaky and trippy and wierd to see myself for the first time.
9's [Julij 1678] Morgens wierd dese hoek van 't land N.O.
I was moody and broke and depressed a lot of times; he spelled weird as 'wierd.'
A stint in the indie rock band Carissa's Wierd led to a run with Band of Horses, which led to a deal with Sub Pop Records, who released her first three solo albums: Sera Cahoone (2006), Only As the Day Is Long (2007), and Dear Creek Canyon (2012).
Yet true to the painter's subcultural allegiances (he was for many years the animating spirit behind New York's Wierd Records and the label's legendary weekly party), it turns that rubric on its head.
But the collection also holds an unusual amount of music for portraying the supernatural on film, including "Gruesome Tales" (Rapee and Axt); "In a Gloomy Forest" (Axt); "Rage: for fiendish anger, sudden outbursts of madness, etc." (Axt); "Mysterious furioso: suitable for infernal and wierd [sic] scenes, witches, etc." (Langey); 'Terror, hideous monster, dark mystery" (Zamecnik); and "A Skeleton Jazz Mysterioso" (Breau).
After the siege of Constantinople he again encounters a Sublime landscape, which heightens his senses and expands his imaginative powers: 'The glare of flames attested the progress of destruction, while, during mingled light and obscurity, the piles around me took gigantic proportions and wierd [sic] shapes.
CHELTENHAM GOLD CUP 3m 2f, Cheltenham Festival, March 2012 9-4 Long Run, 7-2 Kauto Star, 6 Grands Crus,12 Captain Chris, 12 Synchronised, 20 Quito De La Roque, 20 Quel Esprit, 20 Diamond Harry, 20 Wierd Al, 20 Time For Rupert, 20 Jessies Dream, 25 Rubi Light, 25 Burton Port, 25 Riverside Theatre, 33 bar.
"Armenia are a good side, they've proved that," said Long "It's wierd because we could finish top of the table or fourth."
He was also featured in a Discovery Channel Documentary, Wierd Wheels following a segment on his friend, Ray Nelson and the organization he started, Guitars Not Guns.