wildlife

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wild·life

 (wīld′līf′)
n.
Animals that have not been domesticated or tamed and are usually living in a natural environment, including both game and nongame species.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wildlife

(ˈwaɪldˌlaɪf)
n
(Biology) wild animals and plants collectively
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wild•life

(ˈwaɪldˌlaɪf)

n.
undomesticated animals living in the wild, including those hunted for food, sport, or profit.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wildlife - all living things (except people) that are undomesticated; "chemicals could kill all the wildlife"
life - living things collectively; "the oceans are teeming with life"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

wildlife

noun flora and fauna, animals, fauna People were concerned that wildlife could be affected by the pesticides.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
البَريَّه، الحيوانات الضّاريَهحَيَاةٌ بَرِيَّة
divoká zvěř
dyrelivvildt dyreliv
villieläimet ja luontovillieläin
vadvilág
villt náttúra; dÿraríkiî
野生生物
야생 생물
divá zver
divje živaliživalski rezervat
naturliv
สัตว์และพืชป่า
vahşi doğayaban hayatıyabanî hayvanlar
thế giới động vật hoang dã

wildlife

[ˈwaɪldlaɪf]
A. Nfauna f
B. CPD wildlife preserve, wildlife reserve, wildlife sanctuary Nreserva f natural
wildlife trust Nasociación f protectora de la naturaleza
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wildlife

[ˈwaɪldlaɪf] nfaune f et flore f sauvages
I'm interested in wildlife
BUT Je m'intéresse à la nature.wildlife park nréserve f naturellewildlife photographer nphotographe mf animalierwildlife programme némission f animalièrewildlife sanctuary nréserve f naturelle
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wildlife

[ˈwaɪldˌlaɪf]
1. nnatura, flora e fauna
2. adj (sanctuary, reserve) → naturale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

wild

(waild) adjective
1. (of animals) not tamed. wolves and other wild animals.
2. (of land) not cultivated.
3. uncivilized or lawless; savage. wild tribes.
4. very stormy; violent. a wild night at sea; a wild rage.
5. mad, crazy, insane etc. wild with hunger; wild with anxiety.
6. rash. a wild hope.
7. not accurate or reliable. a wild guess.
8. very angry.
ˈwildly adverb
ˈwildness noun
ˈwildfire: spread like wildfire
(of eg news) to spread extremely fast.
ˈwildfowl noun plural
wild birds, especially water birds such as ducks, geese etc.
ˌwild-ˈgoose chase
an attempt to catch or find something one cannot possibly obtain.
ˈwildlife noun
wild animals, birds, insects etc collectively. to protect wildlife.
in the wild
(of an animal) in its natural surroundings. Young animals have to learn to look after themselves in the wild.
the wilds
the uncultivated areas (of a country etc). They're living out in the wilds of Australia somewhere.
the Wild Westwest
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

wildlife

حَيَاةٌ بَرِيَّة divoká zvěř vildt dyreliv wild lebende Tiere und Pflanzen άγρια φύση flora y fauna villieläimet ja luonto faune et flore životinjski svijet (divljač, ptice i ribe) fauna selvaggia 野生生物 야생 생물 dieren in het wild dyreliv dzika przyroda fauna selvagem живая природа naturliv สัตว์และพืชป่า vahşi doğa thế giới động vật hoang dã 野生动植物
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
"Will nothing else do?" she cried at length, in desperation, her large eyes staring at him like those of a wild animal. This dressing her up so prettily by her mother had apparently been to lamentable purpose.
She had now become quiet and, clinging with her little hands to Pierre's coat, sat on his arm gazing about her like some little wild animal. He glanced at her occasionally with a slight smile.
Looking round like some little wild animal at the grown-up big people with her bright black eyes, she smiled, unmistakably pleased at their admiring her, and holding her legs sideways, she pressed vigorously on her arms, and rapidly drew her whole back up after, and then made another step forward with her little arms.
He began to move about with the restlessness of a wild animal that sees prey but cannot reach it.
He gazed at the great houses without respect or envy, at the men with a fierce contempt, at the women with a sore feeling that if by chance he should be brought into contact with any of them they would regard him as a sort of wild animal, to be hurnoured or avoided purely as a matter of self-interest.
It was a wild animal fight; the strong trampled the weak, and the strong, he had already discovered,--men like Dowsett, and Letton, and Guggenhammer,--were not necessarily the best.
At first I thought he was a wild animal, because he wore around his waist and over his shoulders a ragged piece of bearskin.
Toto had been looking with great curiosity in the hole which the boy was digging, and growing more and more excited every minute, perhaps thinking that Button-Bright was after some wild animal. The little dog began barking loudly and jumped into the hole himself, where he began to dig with his tiny paws, making the earth fly in all directions.
But now and then there came a deep growl from some wild animal hidden among the trees.
With the automatic swiftness of a wild animal the black gathered himself to spring.
This decrease, no doubt, must be partly owing to the introduction of spirits, to European diseases (even the milder ones of which, such as the measles, [1] prove very destructive), and to the gradual extinction of the wild animals. It is said that numbers of their children invariably perish in very early infancy from the effects of their wandering life; and as the difficulty of procuring food increases, so must their wandering habits increase; and hence the population, without any apparent deaths from famine, is repressed in a manner extremely sudden compared to what happens in civilized countries, where the father, though in adding to his labour he may injure himself, does not destroy his offspring.
But the one thing he was not afraid of was wild animals of the most ferocious sorts, such as lions, tigers, leopards, and jaguars.