boar

(redirected from Wild pigs)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Wild pigs: Sus scrofa

boar

an animal
Not to be confused with:
boor – a peasant; a course, rude person: He is such a boor that I never invite him.
bore – to drill; a wearisome person; past tense of bear: She bore her pain without complaining.

boar

 (bôr)
n.
1. The wild boar.
2.
a. An uncastrated male pig.
b. The adult male of any of several mammals, such as a badger, raccoon, or guinea pig.

[Middle English bor, from Old English bār.]

boar

(bɔː)
n
1. (Animals) an uncastrated male pig
2. (Animals) See wild boar
[Old English bār; related to Old High German bēr]

boar

(bɔr, boʊr)

n.
1. an uncastrated male swine.
[before 1000; Middle English boor, Old English bār; c. Middle Dutch beer, Old High German bêr]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.boar - Old World wild swine having a narrow body and prominent tusks from which most domestic swine comeboar - Old World wild swine having a narrow body and prominent tusks from which most domestic swine come; introduced in United States
tusk - a long pointed tooth specialized for fighting or digging; especially in an elephant or walrus or hog
swine - stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals
genus Sus, Sus - type genus of the Suidae
2.boar - an uncastrated male hog
swine - stout-bodied short-legged omnivorous animals

boar

noun
Related words
collective noun sounder
Translations
خَنْزيرٌ ذَكَر
verro
divočákkanec
vildsvinvildsvineorne
metssiga
karjuvillisika
vepar
vaddisznóvadkan
gölturvilligölturvillisvín
kuilysšernas
kuilisvepris
dzikknur
diviak
merjasec
galtvildsvin
erkek domuzyaban domuzu

boar

[bɔːʳ] N (= male pig) → cerdo m, verraco m
wild boarjabalí m

boar

[ˈbɔːr] nsanglier m

boar

n (= male pig)Eber m; (wild) → Keiler m; boar’s headSchweinskopf m

boar

[bɔːʳ] n (male pig) → verro; (wild boar) → cinghiale m

boar

(boː) noun
a male pig (especially the wild variety).
References in classic literature ?
But his appearance was no more unusual than the manner of his coming, there to my mother and me as we perched above the angry wild pigs. He came through the trees, leaping from limb to limb and from tree to tree; and he came swiftly.
I remember the out-thrust of his protruding underlip as he glared down at the wild pigs. He snarled something like a dog, and I remember that his eye-teeth were large, like fangs, and that they impressed me tremendously.
Being an island, he says I won't have to bother about wild pigs destroying the young trees.
the roasted flesh of the wild pig the hunter's arrow failed to slay?
So I took the gun and went up a piece into the woods, and was hunting around for some birds when I see a wild pig; hogs soon went wild in them bottoms after they had got away from the prairie farms.
The birds and the monkey-people went north early in the year, for they knew what was coming; and the deer and the wild pig broke far away to the perished fields of the villages, dying sometimes before the eyes of men too weak to kill them.
The deer, wild pig, and buffalo took up the cry hoarsely; and Chil, the Kite, flew in great circles far and wide, whistling and shrieking the warning.
That night they camped in the valley beyond the hills, and as they sat before a little fire where cooked a wild pig that had fallen to one of Tarzan's arrows, the latter sat lost in speculation.
It was not for fun that he had learned while he was with the wolves to imitate the challenge of bucks in the jungle and the grunt of the little wild pig. So, as soon as Messua pronounced a word Mowgli would imitate it almost perfectly, and before dark he had learned the names of many things in the hut.
We saw many small animals, such as porcupines, a scaly ant-eater, and a wild pig, piebald in color and with long curved tusks.
But he had guns, plenty of ammunition, and those Kanakas, trained to the shooting of wild cattle and wild pig, were dead shots.
Numberless other changes must likewise have taken place; the wild pig in some parts probably replaces the peccari; packs of wild dogs may be heard howling on the wooded banks of the less-frequented streams; and the common cat, altered into a large and fierce animal, inhabits rocky hills.