Dampier

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Dampier

(ˈdæmpɪə)
n
(Biography) William. 1652–1715, English navigator, pirate, and writer: sailed around the world twice
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dam•pi•er

(ˈdæm pi ər, ˈdæmp yər)

n.
William, 1652–1715, English explorer and buccaneer.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The book, which must have been somewhat influenced by 'Pilgrim's Progress,' was more directly suggested by a passage in William Dampier's
8), and this assessment was echoed by European travellers--including William Dampier and Thomas Bowrey, who lived in Aceh from 1669 until 1689, were interested in the region and transmitted their knowledge of Aceh back to the West.
He soon became a buccaneer, joining William Dampier's privateers sanctioned by the British government to attack Spanish vessels.
A Sir Walter Raleigh B Christopher Columbus C Captain James Cook D William Dampier 9.
1700 English navigator William Dampier discovers southwest Pacific island of New Britain.
There are no confirmed records of a previous eruption of Kadovar, said Chris Firth, a vulcanologist at Macquarie University, but scientists speculate it could have been one of two "burning islands" mentioned in the journals of a 17th-century English pirate and maritime adventurer, William Dampier.
Williams, a historian, starts with self-taught Englishman William Dampier, who hopped a ship to Java at age 20 to begin a 13-year trip around the world.
Throughout this chapter, Cohen demonstrates how exactly Defoe altered maritime tropes to make them more appealing to readers, in part by reading Crusoe side-by-side with William Dampier's nonfictional travelogue.
In the first section, 'Australian nature discovered, the focus of attention in four essays is on William Dampier, Willem de Vlamingh, Jacques La Billardiere, Claude Riche, Charles-Alexandre Lesueur and Francois Peron.
Many a dugong and bottlenose dolphin and humpback whale can be sighted in the waters of the Dampier Archipelago ( named after William Dampier, who visited the place in 1688).
The first title covers the two Spanish navigators briefly and the Dutch navigators, Dirk Hartog with his famous plate, and Abel Tasman and his discovery of Van Diemen's Land and New Zealand, plus his 1644 voyage along the north-west coast into the Gulf of Carpentaria followed by eight pages on William Dampier's voyages in the Cygnet and the Roebuck.
But Robbin Moran, a plant scientist with an interest in the history of science, suggested the biography of William Dampier (1652-1715) because Dampier was one of the earliest Europeans to write about the natural history of Australia and also explored other areas of the world during a 12-year circumnavigation.