laud

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laud

to praise, honor, extol
Not to be confused with:
loud – having great volume or intensity; The band is very loud.; tastelessly showy; I would not wear such a loud shirt.

laud

 (lôd)
tr.v. laud·ed, laud·ing, lauds
To give praise to; glorify. See Synonyms at praise.
n.
1. Praise; glorification.
2. A hymn or song of praise.
3. lauds also Lauds(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. Ecclesiastical The service of prayers formerly following the matins and constituting with them the first of the seven canonical hours.
b. The time appointed for this service.

[Middle English lauden, from Old French lauder, from Latin laudāre, from laus, laud-, praise.]

laud′er n.

laud

(lɔːd)
vb
(tr) to praise or glorify
n
praise or glorification
[C14: vb from Latin laudāre; n from laudēs, pl of Latin laus praise]
ˈlauder n

Laud

(lɔːd)
n
(Biography) William. 1573–1645, English prelate; archbishop of Canterbury (1633–45). His persecution of Puritans and his High Church policies in England and Scotland were a cause of the Civil War; he was impeached by the Long Parliament (1640) and executed

laud

(lɔd)

v.t.
1. to praise; extol.
n.
2. a song or hymn of praise.
3. lauds, (used with a sing. or pl. v.) a canonical hour of psalms of praise, usu. recited with matins.
[1300–50; (v.) Middle English < Latin laudāre to praise, derivative of laus, s. laud- praise]
laud′er, lau′da•tor (-deɪ tər) n.

Laud

(lɔd)

n.
William, 1573–1645, archbishop of Canterbury and opponent of Puritanism: executed for treason.

laud


Past participle: lauded
Gerund: lauding

Imperative
laud
laud
Present
I laud
you laud
he/she/it lauds
we laud
you laud
they laud
Preterite
I lauded
you lauded
he/she/it lauded
we lauded
you lauded
they lauded
Present Continuous
I am lauding
you are lauding
he/she/it is lauding
we are lauding
you are lauding
they are lauding
Present Perfect
I have lauded
you have lauded
he/she/it has lauded
we have lauded
you have lauded
they have lauded
Past Continuous
I was lauding
you were lauding
he/she/it was lauding
we were lauding
you were lauding
they were lauding
Past Perfect
I had lauded
you had lauded
he/she/it had lauded
we had lauded
you had lauded
they had lauded
Future
I will laud
you will laud
he/she/it will laud
we will laud
you will laud
they will laud
Future Perfect
I will have lauded
you will have lauded
he/she/it will have lauded
we will have lauded
you will have lauded
they will have lauded
Future Continuous
I will be lauding
you will be lauding
he/she/it will be lauding
we will be lauding
you will be lauding
they will be lauding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lauding
you have been lauding
he/she/it has been lauding
we have been lauding
you have been lauding
they have been lauding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lauding
you will have been lauding
he/she/it will have been lauding
we will have been lauding
you will have been lauding
they will have been lauding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lauding
you had been lauding
he/she/it had been lauding
we had been lauding
you had been lauding
they had been lauding
Conditional
I would laud
you would laud
he/she/it would laud
we would laud
you would laud
they would laud
Past Conditional
I would have lauded
you would have lauded
he/she/it would have lauded
we would have lauded
you would have lauded
they would have lauded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.laud - praise, glorify, or honor; "extol the virtues of one's children"; "glorify one's spouse's cooking"
praise - express approval of; "The parents praised their children for their academic performance"
canonise, canonize - treat as a sacred person; "He canonizes women"
ensky - exalt to the skies; lift to the skies or to heaven with praise
crack up - rhapsodize about
hymn - praise by singing a hymn; "They hymned their love of God"

laud

verb (Literary) praise, celebrate, honour, acclaim, approve, magnify (archaic), glorify, extol, sing or sound the praises of They lauded the former president as a hero.

laud

verb
2. To express warm approval of:
3. To honor (a deity) in religious worship:
Translations

laud

[lɔːd] VT (liter) → alabar, elogiar

laud

[ˈlɔːd] vtlouer

laud

vt (old)preisen (geh)
References in periodicals archive ?
| 1645: Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud was beheaded on Tower Hill for treason.
On Wednesday, January 9, at 10.30am our mid-week Communion service commemorates William Laud.
Their task became more daunting when, in the 1620s, the hierarchy and head of the Church of England (i.e., William Laud and Charles I) appeared to embrace Arminianism (read: free-will Protestantism).
HAPPENED ON THIS DAY 1645: Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud was beheaded on Tower Hill for treason.
This professorship, established by William Laud in 1636, is one of the most prestigious positions that helped introduce the teaching of the Arabic language and literature to the University of Oxford, said Al-Babtain.
In Chapter 4, Harmes analyses the trial of Archbishop William Laud, who was tried and executed on trumped-up treason charges.
In the 1630s, Archbishop William Laud made kneeling, once optional, a requirement for all faithful ministers.
Wentworth, though his own religious convictions were far more Puritan, became the close ally of William Laud, the high church Archbishop of Canterbury.
Here Williamson provides crucial historical context in her discussion of how Archbishop William Laud and other anti-Calvinists resisted the prevalent Reformist appropriation of the Catholic altar as a "holy table" or "God's board" (73), repurposed for common use and stripped of ornamentation.
The 14 essays of this collection offer historiography, state-of-research, and new interpretations of the central elements of the English Civil War, with topics that include popish plots, the philosophy of William Laud, royalist political thought with regard to the wars of religion, interpretations of Cromwell's approach to religion and liberty, and the active persecution of Catholics.
These include: the Archbishop William Laud; William Howard, 1st Viscount Stafford; the Leveller John Lilburne; and, most notably, Oliver Cromwell, portrayed as so stern and forbidding that he was mistaken for Peter the Great by the great classical scholar Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717-68).
Debora Shuger addresses the equally tricky subject of religion, reading Browne alongside William Laud, Kenelm Digby, Edward Herbert, and Alexander Ross to characterize the qualities of Browne's tolerance, trace the rise of a "secular theology" in the mid-seventeenth century, and argue that its elite culture could be "more multiform, heterodox, even 'post-Christian', than generally thought" (61).