William of Ockham


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Related to William of Ockham: Ockham's Razor, Thomas Aquinas
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Noun1.William of Ockham - English scholastic philosopher and assumed author of Occam's Razor (1285-1349)William of Ockham - English scholastic philosopher and assumed author of Occam's Razor (1285-1349)
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References in periodicals archive ?
When I am presented with yet another conspiracy theory, the first question I ask is: 'Cui bono?', Latin for 'who benefits?' Another test I apply is Occam's Razor, a philosophical device conceived by an English friar, William of Ockham, in the 14th century.
In the first section, Levering discusses the patristic writers (for example, Tertullian, Gregory of Nazianzus Augustine, and John of Damascus) and medieval commentators (for example, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, and William of Ockham) on natural theology.
This book examines significant writers in Church or literary history: Dante Alighieri, Marsilius of Padua, William of Ockham, Petrarch, Birgitta of Sweden, and Catherine of Siena.
Pourcain on limit decision, mathematics and physics of the first and last instants: Walter Burley and William of Ockham, Nicholas of Autrecourt's Quaestio de intensione visionis revisited: the scola Oxoniensis and Parisian masters on limit decision problems, the limit decision problem and four-dimensionalism, and contradictory change.
William of Ockham, the 14th-century British philosopher, famously postulated that, when bamboozled in the face of competing explanations, we ought to opt for the one with the fewest assumptions and the greatest simplicity.
William of Ockham, the 14th century British philosopher, famously postulated that, when bamboozled in the face of competing explanations, we ought to opt for the one with the fewest assumptions and the greatest simplicity.
William of Ockham, the fourteenth-century British philosopher, famously postulated that, when bamboozled in the face of competing explanations, we ought to opt for the one with the fewest assumptions and the greatest simplicity.
First, in his chapter titled "The Roots of the Crisis," Dreher follows Richard Weaver in blaming William of Ockham, the Franciscan philosopher and theologian who lived from c.
(14) "Nearly two centuries before Luther and Melanchthon made their appeal to the maxim vim vi repellere licere, we already find William of Ockham arguing in the same fashion in his Octo Quaestiones de Potestate Papae.
(41) Civil lordship had to proceed from righteousness or it could not be with God's approval, an idea taken from Augustine and utilized by William of Ockham. The true basis for lordship was justice: 'true civil lordship presupposes the disposition of the virtue of justice in such a lord' which is over and above any law of inheritance or purchase.
Early scholars had fixated on the place of Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, with their doctrines of voluntarism and radicalized nominalism (in the latter's case), as the roots of subjective theories of rights.
WILLIAM OF OCKHAM ON THE PROBLEM REGARDING THE INTROSPECTIVE COGNITION OF OUR INTUITION'S CONTENT IN HIS FIRST WRITINGS