willower

willower

(ˈwɪləʊə)
n
(Textiles) a person who uses or controls a willow machine
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2005 Willower Family Lecture: Leadership according to the evidence.
His Highness praised the team's excellent performance , high sports morale, willower and persistence to meritoriously win the title.
Using conflict resolution skills can also result in creating a positive change within an organization such as a school environment (Martin & Willower, 1981).
Por lo general se asume que una cultura organizacional fuerte lidera hacia el logro de los objetivos de la institucion (Mitchell & Willower, 1992).
The 'concepts' will be identified through the use of frameworks put forward by Silvernail (1992a) regardingbeliefs about education, and Willower, Eidell, and Hoy (1967) regarding learning environments.
Bidwell, 1965; Corwin & Borman, 1988; Willower, 1985) These and other features have come to define for the American public what it means to do school (Eisner, 2003; Metz, 1990).
Smedley & Willower (1981) find control to be a component of the secondary culture as well, but they conclude control in elementary schools is more humanistic, while control in secondary schools is more custodial.
Willower, The Managerial Behavior of High School Principals, Educational Administration Quarterly, volume 17, no.
Greenfield's challenges to traditional positivistic theories of educational administration have themselves been challenged, notably by Griffiths and Willower, and the major arguments of those debates (i.
Haas 1977, Kauffman 1981, Korte 1972, Long and Willower 1980, Toch and Klofas 1984).
The hundred came in 239 minutes, as the stylish willower faced 194 balls, and unleashed a dozen fours and a solitary six off Shillingford to become the 14th Indian to score a hundred on his maiden Test appearance.
McGregor's Theory X describing managers' expectations of employees to be unmotivated and untrustworthy, the Ohio State Studies' autocratic, task-oriented initiating structure, and Willower et al.