windfall

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wind·fall

 (wĭnd′fôl′)
n.
1. A sudden, unexpected piece of good fortune or financial gain.
2. Something, such as a ripened fruit, that has been blown down by the wind.
adj.
Of or relating to a windfall: windfall profits.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

windfall

(ˈwɪndˌfɔːl)
n
1. (Banking & Finance) a piece of unexpected good fortune, esp financial gain
2. (Botany) something blown down by the wind, esp a piece of fruit
3. (Forestry) chiefly US and Canadian a plot of land covered with trees blown down by the wind
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind•fall

(ˈwɪndˌfɔl)

n.
1. an unexpected gain, piece of good fortune, or the like.
2. something blown down by the wind, as fruit.
[1425–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windfall - fruit that has fallen from the tree
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
2.windfall - a sudden happening that brings good fortune (as a sudden opportunity to make money); "the demand for testing has created a boom for those unregulated laboratories where boxes of specimen jars are processed like an assembly line"
happening, natural event, occurrence, occurrent - an event that happens
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

windfall

noun godsend, find, jackpot, bonanza, stroke of luck, manna from heaven, pot of gold at the end of the rainbow If you had a windfall of £5000, how would you spend it?
disaster, misfortune, bad luck, mishap, misadventure, mischance, infelicity
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
حَظ غَيْر مُتَوَقَّعما تُسْقِطُه الرّيح من فاكِهَة الشَّجَر
nedfaldsæble
jättipottipudokas
hullott gyümölcs
óvænt heppni
nečakaný úspech
devlet kuşurüzgârın düşürdüğü meyve

windfall

[ˈwɪndfɔːl]
A. N
1. (= apple etc) → fruta f caída
2. (fig) → dinero m caído del cielo
B. CPD windfall profits NPLbeneficios mpl imprevistos
windfall tax N impuesto sobre determinados beneficios extraordinarios
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

windfall

[ˈwɪndfɔːl] n
(= sum of money) → rentrée f d'argent inattendue
(= apple, pear) → fruit m tombéwindfall tax ntaxe f exceptionnelle sur les bénéfices (des entreprises privatisées)wind farm [ˈwɪndfɑːrm] nparc m éolien
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

windfall


windfall

:
windfall profit
n (Econ) → Marktlagengewinn m, → Q-Gewinn m
windfall tax
n (Econ) → Spekulationssteuer f, → Steuer fauf Aktiengewinne
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

windfall

[ˈwɪndˌfɔːl] n (apple) → frutto fatto cadere dal vento (fig) → colpo di fortuna
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

wind1

(wind) noun
1. (an) outdoor current of air. The wind is strong today; There wasn't much wind yesterday; Cold winds blow across the desert.
2. breath. Climbing these stairs takes all the wind out of me.
3. air or gas in the stomach or intestines. His stomach pains were due to wind.
verb
to cause to be out of breath. The heavy blow winded him.
adjective
(of a musical instrument) operated or played using air pressure, especially a person's breath.
ˈwindy adjective
a windy hill-top; a windy day; It's windy today.
ˈwindiness noun
ˈwindfall noun
1. an apple etc blown from a tree.
2. any unexpected gain or success.
ˈwindmill noun
a machine with sails that work by wind power, for grinding corn or pumping water.
ˈwindpipe noun
the passage for air between mouth and lungs.
windsurf, windsurfer, windsurfingwindˈwindscreen noun
(American ˈwindshield).
1. a transparent (usually glass) screen above the dashboard of a car.
2. a wall usually constructed out from the house wall to protect people on a patio or balcony from the wind.
ˈwindsock noun
a device for indicating the direction and speed of wind on an airfield.
windsurf (ˈwindsəːf) verb
to move across water while standing on a windsurfer.
ˈwindsurfer noun
1. (also sailboard) a board with a sail for moving across water with the aid of the wind.
2. the person controlling this board.
ˈwindsurfing noun
ˈwindswept adjective
exposed to the wind and showing the effects of it. windswept hair; a windswept landscape.
get the wind up
to become nervous or anxious. She got the wind up when she realized how close we were to the edge.
get wind of
to get a hint of or hear indirectly about.
get one's second wind
to recover one's natural breathing after breathlessness.
in the wind
about to happen. A change of policy is in the wind.
like the wind
very quickly. The horse galloped away like the wind.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the Government's aim to tax the windfall profits on large-scale housing projects to pay for the infrastructure has been undermined.
STUDENT accommodation group Unite is celebrating windfall profits after a property asset revaluation.
The association has been calling on about 60 brokerages to give up the windfall profits from the botched trading.
'[The windfall profits tax] is applied to income from mining operations before corporate income tax and it's tied to operating margins.
"Energy windfall profits should be redirected to give six million homes an immediate pounds 250 each this winter to pay for essentials like heating."
Henningsen also calls for auctioning revenue and windfall profits in the electricity sector from the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) to provide at least 2 billion per year for investment in climate-friendly technology in developing countries.
Mr Field said: "It's quite clear British consumers are subsidising French consumers, or that the company is making extraordinary windfall profits.
DEMOCRATIC presidential candidate Barack Obama has said he would impose a windfall profits tax on US oil companies and he would use this money to help families pay for their skyrocketing energy costs.
The association argues its methodawould reduce electricity cost increases for consumers as well as prevent windfall profits made by electricity generators falling under the EU ETS.
The report said the UK energy industry made about pounds 1 billion windfall profits in the first year of the EU ETS when it was given free emissions credits.
BP has admitted that its production arm is making windfall profits at anything over $20 a barrel.
The Japan Securities Dealers Association has been considering urging the brokerages to contribute the windfall profits to the Japan Investor Protection Fund, but tax and other problems have to be solved.