Pegasus

(redirected from Winged Horses)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Peg·a·sus

 (pĕg′ə-səs)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A winged horse that with a stroke of his hoof caused the fountain Hippocrene to spring forth from Mount Helicon.
2. A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Aquarius and Andromeda.

[Middle English, from Latin Pēgasus, from Greek Pēgasos.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pegasus

(ˈpɛɡəsəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth an immortal winged horse, which sprang from the blood of the slain Medusa and enabled Bellerophon to achieve many great deeds as his rider

Pegasus

(ˈpɛɡəsəs)
n, Latin genitive Pegasi (ˈpɛɡəˌsaɪ)
(Celestial Objects) a constellation in the N hemisphere lying close to Andromeda and Pisces
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Peg•a•sus

(ˈpɛg ə səs)

n. gen. -si (-ˌsaɪ) for 2.
1. a winged horse of Greek myth.
2. the Winged Horse, a northern constellation between Cygnus and Aquarius.
Pe•ga•si•an (pəˈgeɪ si ən) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Peg·a·sus

(pĕg′ə-səs)
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Aquarius and Andromeda.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pegasus - (Greek mythology) the immortal winged horse that sprang from the blood of the slain MedusaPegasus - (Greek mythology) the immortal winged horse that sprang from the blood of the slain Medusa; was tamed by Bellerophon with the help of a bridle given him by Athena; as the flying horse of the Muses it is a symbol of highflying imagination
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
2.Pegasus - a constellation in the northern hemisphere near Andromeda and Pisces
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Pegas
PegasusPegasos
Pegasus
PégaszoszPegazus
Pegasus

Pegasus

[ˈpegəsəs] NPegaso m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Pegasus

nPegasus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Pegasus

[ˈpɛgəsəs] n (Myth, Astron) → Pegaso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I was a little surprised to see Turks and Greeks playing newsboy right here in the mysterious land where the giants and genii of the Arabian Nights once dwelt--where winged horses and hydra-headed dragons guarded enchanted castles--where Princes and Princesses flew through the air on carpets that obeyed a mystic talisman--where cities whose houses were made of precious stones sprang up in a night under the hand of the magician, and where busy marts were suddenly stricken with a spell and each citizen lay or sat, or stood with weapon raised or foot advanced, just as he was, speechless and motionless, till time had told a hundred years!
Longfellow, I believe, is not yet at the Oxbow, else the winged horse would neigh at him.
For what is it to imagine a winged horse but to affirm that the horse [that horse, namely] has wings?
The Pegasus's legs might have been more to the purpose; but, underneath the winged horse upon the sign-board, the Pegasus's Arms was inscribed in Roman letters.
(I'm grateful to Jas Eisner for sharing this image with me: I wish other visitors to the exhibition had the same privilege.) Similarly, it seems odd to show a Sasanian silk textile fragment with winged horses without hinting at the rich illustrated tradition of the Night Journey story, in which the Prophet files to heaven on a winged horse.
As a former warrior in Asgard's honourable female Valkyrie fleet, she would ride winged horses to fight evil and protect the people.
From miniature steel roosters and winged horses on the hood, funny yet close to insulting one-liners that are hand-painted on the ceiling, flying ribbons and colorful prints, to levers and strings that form a mechanism allowing the driver to know if somebody wants to alight, jeepneys have certainly evolved as a representation of our wit and artistry.
Hela's Attack - In what could be a flashback to (http://www.ibtimes.com/thor-ragnarok-changes-helas-comic-book-backstory-2504910) Hela's  early days at the 47-second mark, the Goddess of Death is almost unrecognizable in her traditional costume (complete with an elaborate headpiece), and warriors on what appear to be Pegasuses (winged horses) seem to be attacking her.
With a little help from Merida (from the Disney movie "Brave") Sofia finds her inner courage and determination to help winged horses in need!
The second installment in The Guardian Herd series, Stormbound continues the story of the Pegasi of Anok (mythical winged horses), which consist of five herds with their own territorial leader--the over-stallions--and their own land.
Animal figures such as winged horses, antlered deer, a ring of cats with furled tails, a peacock, multiple clever foxes, a quartet of honeybees, lizards with tails entwined, interlaced owls, and many more are featured in circular, harmonious designs that yearn to be realized in full, beautiful colors.