Winnipegger


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Winnipegger

(ˈwɪnɪˌpɛɡə)
n
(Placename) a native or inhabitant of Winnipeg
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John's this past November as Cinderella in Stephen Sondheim's Into the Woods, directed by another Winnipegger, Donna Fletcher.
Rick Harp, a Winnipegger of Cree descent, was upset after a June 25 visit by Canada's natural resources and northern Ontario development minister, Greg Rickford, failed to yield anything more than the $1 million already promised last year towards the road's design costs.
I would not be a true Winnipegger if I didn't look for a deal before making a purchase.In the city I come from in Canada we are notorious for being 'coupon-cutters'.
Perhaps Reading by Lightning rings with a particular truth for those of us who grew up on stories of prairie survival, come hell or low water, loan Thomas, a Winnipegger, was presumably raised on the same lore, and she has used it to good effect, to vivify Lily's Dirty Thirties childhood and to make her father's experiences a generation earlier equally palpable.
Beverly Rasporich's account of the art of the avant garde Jewish Winnipegger Esther Warkov also complicates "Wild West" narratives.
New to the country music scene is Winnipegger Ashley Robertson, whose new CD Ashley Robertson is impressing the people who make a difference in the music industry around the world--the fans.
The Netanyahu speaking tour was arranged by the Jewish Winnipegger Izzy Asper, owner of the Post, who himself compared the demonstrators to "Nazi Brown Shirts", a reference to the Nazi group of goons in Germany who used to beat up opponents of the National-Socialist Labour Party of Adolf Hitler in the 1920s and 1930s.
Winnipegger Amy Tuckett-McGimpsey started a Change.org petition that garnered 30,468 signers.
Directed by Winnipegger Robert Herriot, the production also featured the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra conducted by Tyrone Paterson.
Other individuals including Winnipegger Mary Thomson, who traveled across the Atlantic in 1897, 1898, 1910, and 1914, as well as Montreal financier Edward Greenfield, who also made four transatlantic voyages between 1894 and 1913, recorded their experiences in private diaries.
The majority of posters were strongly opposed to the standpoint of the Aboriginal community reported in the two news items--especially in terms of the framing of McDougall's death as a "senseless killing." Winnipegger's comment, which received the most recommendations by readers of the first news item, was typical:
"I hate Winnipeggers," a friend announced as I introduced him to a Winnipegger at a Montreal art opening.