witch

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witch

a female thought to have special powers derived from the devil; a female sorcerer; an ugly evil-looking old woman: Many fairytales feature a scary witch.
Not to be confused with:
which – an interrogative pronoun, used in questions about alternatives: Which dessert would you like?
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

witch

 (wĭch)
n.
1. A person, especially a woman, claiming or popularly believed to possess magical powers and practice sorcery.
2. A believer or follower of Wicca; a Wiccan.
3.
a. Offensive An old woman considered to be ugly or frightening.
b. A woman considered to be spiteful or overbearing.
c. Informal A woman or girl considered to be charming or fascinating.
4. One particularly skilled or competent at one's craft: "A witch of a writer, [she] is capable of developing an intensity that verges on ferocity" (Peter S. Prescott).
v. witched, witch·ing, witch·es
v.tr.
1. To work or cast a spell on; bewitch.
2. To cause, bring, or effect by witchcraft.
v.intr.
To use a divining rod to find underground water or minerals; dowse.

[Middle English wicche, from Old English wicce, witch, and wicca, wizard, sorcerer; see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

witch′er·y (-ə-rē) n.
witch′y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

witch

(wɪtʃ)
n
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) historically, in mythology and fiction, a woman believed to practise magic or sorcery, esp black magic
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) a practitioner of a Nature-based religion founded on ancient beliefs, which honours both a male and female divine principle and includes the practice of magic, esp healing magic, and divination
3. informal derogatory an ugly or wicked woman
4. a fascinating or enchanting woman
5. (Alternative Belief Systems) short for water witch
vb
6. (Alternative Belief Systems) (tr) to cause or change by or as if by witchcraft
7. a less common word for bewitch
[Old English wicca; related to Middle Low German wicken to conjure, Swedish vicka to move to and fro]
ˈwitchˌlike adj

witch

(wɪtʃ)
n
(Animals) a flatfish, Pleuronectes (or Glyptocephalus) cynoglossus, of N Atlantic coastal waters, having a narrow greyish-brown body marked with tiny black spots: family Pleuronectidae (plaice, flounders, etc)
[C19: perhaps from witch1, alluding to the appearance of the fish]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

witch

(wɪtʃ)

n.
1. a person, now esp. a woman, who professes or is believed to practice magic, esp. black magic; sorceress.
2. an ugly or mean old woman; hag.
3. a person who uses a divining rod; dowser.
v.t.
4. to subject to or bring about by or as if by witchcraft.
5. Archaic. to affect as if by witchcraft; bewitch; charm.
v.i. Compare warlock.
[before 900; Middle English wicche, Old English wicce (feminine); compare Old English wicca (masculine) wizard, akin to wiccian to practice magic, c. Middle Low German wikken]
witch′hood, n.
witch′like`, adj.
witch′y, adj. witch•i•er, witch•i•est.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

witch

  • troll - Originally a witch or sorceress.
  • fly-by-night - Said to be an old term of reproach to a woman signifying that she was a witch, and was extended to "anyone who departs hastily from a recent activity," especially while owing money.
  • hag - First meant "witch."
  • witch - In Old English, it was actually wicca and originally (c. 890) was a man who practiced magic or sorcery, who we now call a wizard; by the year 1000, witch came to be defined as "a female magician or sorceress."
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

witch


Past participle: witched
Gerund: witching

Imperative
witch
witch
Present
I witch
you witch
he/she/it witches
we witch
you witch
they witch
Preterite
I witched
you witched
he/she/it witched
we witched
you witched
they witched
Present Continuous
I am witching
you are witching
he/she/it is witching
we are witching
you are witching
they are witching
Present Perfect
I have witched
you have witched
he/she/it has witched
we have witched
you have witched
they have witched
Past Continuous
I was witching
you were witching
he/she/it was witching
we were witching
you were witching
they were witching
Past Perfect
I had witched
you had witched
he/she/it had witched
we had witched
you had witched
they had witched
Future
I will witch
you will witch
he/she/it will witch
we will witch
you will witch
they will witch
Future Perfect
I will have witched
you will have witched
he/she/it will have witched
we will have witched
you will have witched
they will have witched
Future Continuous
I will be witching
you will be witching
he/she/it will be witching
we will be witching
you will be witching
they will be witching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been witching
you have been witching
he/she/it has been witching
we have been witching
you have been witching
they have been witching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been witching
you will have been witching
he/she/it will have been witching
we will have been witching
you will have been witching
they will have been witching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been witching
you had been witching
he/she/it had been witching
we had been witching
you had been witching
they had been witching
Conditional
I would witch
you would witch
he/she/it would witch
we would witch
you would witch
they would witch
Past Conditional
I would have witched
you would have witched
he/she/it would have witched
we would have witched
you would have witched
they would have witched
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

witch


click for a larger image
From the Anglo-Saxon wicca, meaning “the wise one;” a person who practices witchcraft.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.witch - a female sorcerer or magician
occultist - a believer in occultism; someone versed in the occult arts
2.witch - a being (usually female) imagined to have special powers derived from the devil
coven - an assembly of witches; usually 13 witches
imaginary being, imaginary creature - a creature of the imagination; a person that exists only in legends or myths or fiction
pythoness - a witch with powers of divination
warlock - a male witch or demon
3.witch - a believer in Wicca
pagan - a person who follows a polytheistic or pre-Christian religion (not a Christian or Muslim or Jew)
4.witch - an ugly evil-looking old womanwitch - an ugly evil-looking old woman  
old woman - a woman who is old
Verb1.witch - cast a spell over someone or somethingwitch - cast a spell over someone or something; put a hex on someone or something
voodoo - bewitch by or as if by a voodoo
spell - place under a spell
becharm, charm - control by magic spells, as by practicing witchcraft
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

witch

noun enchantress, magician, hag, crone, occultist, sorceress, Wiccan, necromancer am evil witch who had cast a spell on the prince
Quotations
"witch: (1) An ugly and repulsive old woman, in a wicked league with the devil. (2) A beautiful and attractive young woman, in wickedness a league beyond the devil" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

witch

noun
1. A woman who practices magic:
2. An ugly, frightening old woman:
Slang: biddy.
Archaic: trot.
3. Informal. A usually unscrupulous woman who seduces or exploits men:
Informal: vamp.
verb
To act upon with or as if with magic:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَاحِرَةساحِرَه
čarodějnice
heks
HexeHundszungeRotzunge
noita
vještica
boszorkány
galdranorn
魔女
마녀
ragana
ragana
čarodejnica
čarovnica
häxa
แม่มด
cadıbüyücü kadın
mụ phù thủy

witch

[wɪtʃ]
A. Nbruja f
B. CPD witch doctor Nhechicero m
witch hazel Nolmo m escocés
witch hunt Ncaza f de brujas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

witch

[ˈwɪtʃ] nsorcière f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

witch

n (lit, fig)Hexe f

witch

:
witchcraft
nHexerei f, → Zauberei f; a book on witchein Buch über (die) Hexenkunst
witch doctor
nMedizinmann m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

witch

[wɪtʃ] nstrega
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

witch

(witʃ) noun
a woman who is supposed to have powers of magic, usually through working with the devil.
ˈwitchcraft noun
magic practised by a witch etc.
ˈwitch-doctor noun
in some African tribes, a person whose profession is to cure illness and keep away evil magical influences.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

witch

سَاحِرَة čarodějnice heks Hexe μάγισσα bruja, brujo noita sorcière vještica strega 魔女 마녀 heks heks czarodziejka bruxa ведьма häxa แม่มด cadı mụ phù thủy 巫婆
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
He saw three youths receive their first war spears in a weird ceremony which the grotesque witch-doctor strove successfully to render uncanny and awesome.
He saw the zebra's tail dipped into a caldron of water above which the witch-doctor had made magical passes the while he danced and leaped about it, and he saw the breasts and foreheads of each of the three novitiates sprinkled with the charmed liquid.
They needed little to release the accumulated pressure of static nerve force which the terrorizing mummery of the witch-doctor had induced.
Even the witch-doctor paused in the midst of an intricate step, remaining momentarily rigid and statuesque as he plumbed his cunning mind for a suggestion as how best he might take advantage of the condition of his audience and the timely interruption.
For a moment Tarzan stood looking straight at the witch-doctor. Every eye was upon him, yet no one had moved-- a paralysis of terror held them, to be broken a moment later as the ape-man, with a toss of head, stepped straight toward the hideous figure beneath the buffalo head.
Upon another occasion and by daylight, the warriors would doubtless have leaped to attack him, but at night, and this night of all others, when they were wrought to such a pitch of nervous dread by the uncanny artistry of their witch-doctor, they were helpless with terror.
The witch-doctor, having no idea of the meaning of the other's words, danced a few strange steps, leaped high in the air, turning completely around and alighting in a stooping posture with feet far outspread and head thrust out toward the ape-man.
Seeing that his antics had no potency with the visitor, the witch-doctor tried some new medicine.
The circles therefore were few and rapid, and when they were completed, the witch-doctor struck an attitude which was intended to be awe inspiring and waving the zebra's tail before him, drew an imaginary line between himself and Tarzan.
Tarzan recognized the ear-marks of the witch-doctor and awaited Numa's charge with a feeling of pleasurable anticipation, for the ape-man had no love for witch-doctors; but in the instant that Numa did charge, the white man suddenly recalled that the lion had stolen his kill a few minutes before and that revenge is sweet.
Where he had fallen beneath the spring of the lion the witch-doctor lay, torn and bleeding, unable to drag himself away and watched the terrific battle between these two lords of the jungle.
And came the time once more when the witch-doctor no longer doubted the outcome of the duel, yet his first judgment was reversed, for now he knew that the jungle god would slay Simba and the old black was even more terrified of his own impending fate at the hands of the victor than he had been by the sure and sudden death which the triumphant lion would have meted out to him.