withdrawment

withdrawment

(wɪðˈdrɔːmənt)
n
an obsolete word for withdrawal1
References in periodicals archive ?
In common use, the term "recess" (without "the") meant only "A retreat, a withdrawment; a place of retirement, a secret abode; remission, a suspension of any procedure...." (74) In legislative practice, "recess" (without "the") could refer to any time when the legislature is not physically sitting, (75) including intrasession breaks (76) and apparently even a noon recess.
"It is the grand distinction of humanity," he announced in one sermon from the 1850s, "to receive and entemple the Infinite Spirit; to be energized by him," so that "as matter is open to the free access and unimpeded passage of the electric flash, so is the soul open to the subtle motions of the Eternal Spirit." Disdaining "a certain class of devotees," who practiced "abnegations, penances, macerations, poverties, mortifications, vows of solitude, and complete withdrawment from the world," he preached instead a gospel of blessed longing.