Witwatersrand

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Wit·wa·ters·rand

 (wĭt-wô′tərz-rănd′, -ränd′, -wŏt′ərz-) Often called Rand (rănd)
A region of northeast South Africa between the Vaal River and Johannesburg. It has been one of the richest gold-mining areas in the world since the discovery of gold there in 1886.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Witwatersrand

(wɪtˈwɔːtəzˌrænd; Afrikaans vətˈvɑːtərsˈrant)
n
(Placename) a rocky ridge in NE South Africa: contains the richest gold deposits in the world, also coal and manganese; chief industrial centre is Johannesburg. Height: 1500–1800 m (5000–6000 ft). Also called: the Rand or the Reef
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Wit•wa•ters•rand

(ˈwɪtˌwɔ tərzˌrænd, -ˌwɒt ərz-)

n.
a rocky ridge in S Transvaal, in the Republic of South Africa, near Johannesburg: gold mining. Also called The Rand.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Witwatersrand - a rocky region in the southern Transvaal in northeastern South Africa; contains rich gold deposits and coal and manganese
Transvaal - a province of northeastern South Africa originally inhabited by Africans who spoke Bantu; colonized by the Boers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A base map was generated using topographical layers (1: 50 000) on ArcGisA(r) Explorer and GIS distribution layers for the base geology (Ventersdorp and Witwatersrand systems), Clutia pulchella (the food plant) and Crematogaster liengmei (the cocktail ant) (Figure 1).