wolf spider

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wolf spider

n.
Any of various spiders of the family Lycosidae that stalk prey on the ground and do not spin webs.

wolf spider

n
(Animals) any spider of the family Lycosidae, which chase their prey to catch it. Also called: hunting spider

wolf′ spi`der


n.
any of numerous spiders of the family Lycosidae, living in crevices on the ground and hunting prey directly rather than capturing them in a web.
[1600–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wolf spider - ground spider that hunts its prey instead of using a webwolf spider - ground spider that hunts its prey instead of using a web
spider - predatory arachnid with eight legs, two poison fangs, two feelers, and usually two silk-spinning organs at the back end of the body; they spin silk to make cocoons for eggs or traps for prey
family Lycosidae, Lycosidae - wolf spiders
European wolf spider, Lycosa tarentula, tarantula - large southern European spider once thought to be the cause of tarantism (uncontrollable bodily movement)
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of those calls are for either a false widow or wolf spiders.
The most gratuitous smear of Arachnid Americans: Carson: "I have never been a fan of big hairy wolf spiders.
Wolf spiders move inside during the winter months to keep warm, climb walls and hide in dark places.
In addition, wolf spiders pursue prey on shorter, grazed land, while money spiders form small, circular webs on the same pastures.
While wolf spiders in general are known for their sharp eyesight, the Kauai wolf spider is eyeless, relying exclusively on touch--its sensitive hairs allow it to track prey.
55 percent of ingested nicotine to create smoker's breath strong enough to fend off attacking wolf spiders, the researchers report December 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
1 ( ANI ): Researchers have found a caterpillar that has a unique defence mechanism against some of their predators such as wolf spiders.
Sulfur concentrations in Araneae and Coleoptera were approximately twice those predicted from protein and amino acid concentrations (including taurine) measured in wolf spiders and beetles by Ramsay & Houston (2003).
Australian wolf spiders are scary-looking and can give you a nasty bite, but they aren't venomous.
Walkers can also see first-hand the varied types of indigenous desert animals, from Arabian oryx, Arabian hare, falcons and sand gazelles, to the weird and wonderful spiny-tailed lizards, wolf spiders, and toad headed agama.
Patterns in the distribution of two wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae) in two soybean agroecosystems.
In the Brookings laboratory, Lundgren and colleagues offered hungry predators (from formidable ground beetles to wolf spiders to ants) a smorgasbord of rootworm larvae and pupae.