Wolf-Rayet star


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Wolf-Rayet star

(ˈwʊlfˈreɪət)
n
(Astronomy) any of a small class of very hot intensely luminous stars surrounded by a rapidly expanding envelope of gas
[C19: named after Charles Wolf (1827–1918) and Georges Rayet (1839–1906), French astronomers]
References in periodicals archive ?
The set included white dwarfs, red dwarfs, main sequence stars, giant stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, carbon stars, etc.
But Nasty 1 doesn't look like a typical Wolf-Rayet star.
Wolf-Rayet stars are extremely hot and energetic evolved stars of the live-fast-die-young category.
The idea is that aluminum-26 flung from the Wolf-Rayet star is carried outwards on grains of dust formed around the star.
Unfortunately, the lifecycle of a Wolf-Rayet star is only a few hundred thousand years - the blink of an eye in cosmic terms," NASA explained in a (http://www.
Astronomers might have new insight into the formation of Wolf-Rayet stars, massive stars stripped of their outer hydrogen layers.
The new data show that the black hole and the Wolf-Rayet star dance around each other in a diabolic waltz, with a period of about 32 hours.
Akin to the winds of ionized particles blowing out from the sun, these winds of O and Wolf-Rayet stars are much more powerful, with speeds of 2,000 to 4,000 kilometers per second.
The Crescent, a 20' x 10' arc of nebulosity thrown off by a Wolf-Rayet star, is admittedly tough, even with a filter.
The more common type of gamma-ray burst is thought to be caused when a Wolf-Rayet star in the final phase of its evolution collapses into a black hole at its own core.
At the center of Cygnus X-3, lies a massive Wolf-Rayet star.
The star that is creating this nebula is a Wolf-Rayet star that is expected to detonate as a supernova anytime between 10 million and 20 million years from now.