Wolf-Rayet star


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Wolf-Rayet star

(ˈwʊlfˈreɪət)
n
(Astronomy) any of a small class of very hot intensely luminous stars surrounded by a rapidly expanding envelope of gas
[C19: named after Charles Wolf (1827–1918) and Georges Rayet (1839–1906), French astronomers]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
But Nasty 1 doesn't look like a typical Wolf-Rayet star. The astronomers using Hubble had expected to see twin lobes of gas flowing from opposite sides of the star, perhaps similar to those emanating from the massive star Eta Carinae, which is a Wolf-Rayet candidate.
Esteban, "The ionized gas at the centre of IC10: a possible localized chemical pollution by Wolf-Rayet stars," Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, vol.411, no.3, pp.
Wolf-Rayet stars are extremely hot and energetic evolved stars of the live-fast-die-young category.
Before exploding, these stars, then known as Wolf-Rayet stars, have lost their outer atmosphere and slimmed down to a mere 10 to 20 times the mass of the sun.
"The idea is that aluminum-26 flung from the Wolf-Rayet star is carried outwards on grains of dust formed around the star.
Massey, "Spectroscopic studies of Wolf-Rayet stars. V-Optical spectrophotometry of the emission lines in Small Magellanic Cloud stars," The Astrophysical Journal, vol.341, pp.113-119, 1989.
"Unfortunately, the lifecycle of a Wolf-Rayet star is only a few hundred thousand years - the blink of an eye in cosmic terms," NASA explained in a (http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/goddard/2016/hubbles-blue-bubble/) statement  released last year.
In 1998 he obtained a spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star HD192163 in Cygnus.
The black hole's curious partner is a Wolf-Rayet star, which also has a mass of about twenty times as much as the Sun.
The star is the hottest Wolf-Rayet star known, with a surface temperature of 120,O00 kelvins, nearly 20 times that of the sun.
The Crescent, a 20' x 10' arc of nebulosity thrown off by a Wolf-Rayet star, is admittedly tough, even with a filter.
The more common type of gamma-ray burst is thought to be caused when a Wolf-Rayet star in the final phase of its evolution collapses into a black hole at its own core.