Wolf-Rayet star

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Wolf-Rayet star

(ˈwʊlfˈreɪət)
n
(Astronomy) any of a small class of very hot intensely luminous stars surrounded by a rapidly expanding envelope of gas
[C19: named after Charles Wolf (1827–1918) and Georges Rayet (1839–1906), French astronomers]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Somewhat similar are the Wolf-Rayet galaxies, which instead have unusually large populations of Wolf-Rayet stars. These rare superluminous blue stars are burning through a short-lived evolutionary phase characterized by a distinct spectral signature that's often useful in determining the rate of star formation.
The visuals include Wolf-Rayet stars that are all within about 1.5 light years of the area the video focuses on.
The set included white dwarfs, red dwarfs, main sequence stars, giant stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, carbon stars, etc.
Another way Wolf-Rayet stars are said to form is when a massive star ejects its own hydrogen envelope in a strong stellar wind streaming with charged particles.
The masses of these so-called Wolf-Rayet stars are up to 250 times the mass of the Sun.
Reports from star surveys update the search for Wolf-Rayet stars, O stars, galactic star clusters, massive star nebulae, and luminous blue variable stars.
I shall present studies some spectral type thought to be directly connected to binarity (B[e] supergiants and dusty Wolf-Rayet stars).
Esteban, "The ionized gas at the centre of IC10: a possible localized chemical pollution by Wolf-Rayet stars," Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, vol.411, no.3, pp.
Wolf-Rayet stars are extremely hot and energetic evolved stars of the live-fast-die-young category.
Also highlighted are hydrogen-deficient stars in close binary systems, and massive Wolf-Rayet stars and their relation to Type I supernovae and Gamma-ray bursts.
Before exploding, these stars, then known as Wolf-Rayet stars, have lost their outer atmosphere and slimmed down to a mere 10 to 20 times the mass of the sun.