Wolfensohn


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Wolfensohn

(ˈwʊlfənˌsəʊn)
n
(Biography) James D., known as Jim. born 1933, US businessman and international official, born in Australia; president of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank) (1995–2005); honorary knighthood (1995)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
But even before they get attacked in America, I have my own bone to pick with Kohler and Wolfensohn. I wonder whether, on their visit to Tanzania, their press officers drew their attention to the following news item:
The Finnish Prime Minister's Office has reportedly filed an official complaint over the incident last Thursday (29 March) when World Bank President James Wolfensohn was hit in the face by cream pies during a press conference.
Wile activists tried, mostly in vain, to refocus media attention on the issues, World Bank President James Wolfensohn was busy confusing matters.
When the World Bank President, James Wolfensohn, addressed the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, he said that the Bank's reserves were $23 billion.
At the World Bank, Jim Wolfensohn [the president of the Bank] agreed with me on most of the substantive issues.
"We discovered Softbank; they didn't discover us," said World Bank President James Wolfensohn. "We were looking for a company with a body of knowledge and active companies operating on the Internet."
These talks have the backing of the bank's president, James Wolfensohn, who described himself to bishops at Lambeth as a man of faith.
World Bank President Mr James Wolfensohn, who has waged a campaign against corruption since taking office in 1995, acknowledged in a message to the bank's 8,600 headquarters staff that an investigation had been undertaken.
business community was represented in plenary sessions by James Wolfensohn, World Bank president, and John Whitney, executive director of Columbia University's Deming Center, and in workshops by business leaders, some of whom wrote the brief synopses of their panels' proceedings that follow.
Soon after he took office as president of the World Bank in 1995, James Wolfensohn gathered 250 of his top managers for a meeting at the Bank's imposing white stone-and-glass headquarters in Washington, DC.
Wolfensohn personally visited, accompanied by the then Finance Minister of Pakistan, was the Orangi Pilot Project (OPP) founded by Dr.