Wolfram von Eschenbach


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Wolfram von Eschenbach

(German ˈvɔlfram fɔn ˈɛʃənbax)
n
(Biography) died ?1220, German poet: author of the epic Parzival, incorporating the story of the Grail
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Wolf•ram von Esch•en•bach

(ˈvɔl frɑm fən ˈɛʃ ənˌbɑx, ˈwʊl frəm vɒn ˈɛʃ ənˌbɑk)
n.
c1170–c1220, German poet.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(Wolfram von Eschenbach, Parzival, 276,19-20) [el hombre mas valiente que una madre trajo al mundo.] 16) und wizzet wol daz vordes nie in der werlde dehein man sch&ner phert me gewan.
Indeed, the works of authors of the period such as Gottfried von Strassburg and Wolfram von Eschenbach present a direct challenge to the Church, secularizing the divine and finding it outside of the official doctrine.
588--"the figure of the monk Ilsan in the Rosengarten": a medieval poem by Wolfram von Eschenbach
Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival has been seen as a precursor to the modern Bildungsroman or novel of self-development.
Beginning with Wolfram von Eschenbach's description of Parzival's penis, Schultz examines the ways in which erotic significance was ascribed to the body, or any part thereof.
In Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival, the Holy Grail is not a vessel or chalice as it is usually depicted, but instead is a translucent green stone carried in procession by a band of radiantly beautiful young women.
Goering lucidly outlines the chronology and contents of the grail stories of Chretien de Troyes, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Robert de Boron.
Also available in a hardcover edition (0268041083, $50.00), Reading The Medieval Book: Word, Image, And Performance In Wolfram Von Eschenbach's Willehalm by Kathryn Starkey (Assistant Professor, Department of Germanic Languages, University of North Carolina--Chapel Hill), examines one of the most important epic poems in 13th Century Germany and its redaction in a richly illustrated manuscript created just fifty-five years after the poem's composition.
But Miner never mentions Wolfram von Eschenbach, the 13th-century Bavarian knight who tried in his Parziral to reconcile courtly love with marriage.