womanist

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wom·an·ist

 (wo͝om′ən-ĭst)
adj.
Having or expressing a belief in or respect for women and their talents and abilities beyond the boundaries of race and class.
n.
One whose beliefs or actions are informed by womanist ideals.

wom′an·ism n.

womanist

(ˈwʊmənɪst)
n
1. (Sociology) a supporter or theorist of womanism
2. obsolete a womanizer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Her work as a theologian has largely been focused on African-American religiOUS history, womanist theology and African-American literature.
According to Warnock, more than black theology, Womanist theology is farther removed from the black church.
The Gospel Play, Womanist Theology, and Tyler Perry's Artistic Project" by Robert J.
While womanist theology is integral to the first and second waves, this third wave has yet to identify the evolution of womanist theology.
Standing in the Shoes My Mother Made: A Womanist Theology by Diana L.
Womanist theology is organically related to black male liberation theology and feminist theology in its various expressions (including African women's, Mujerista, Jewish and Asian women's theology) in that it affirms the full humanity of women.
4) This fact is affirmed by the World Council of Churches (WCC) in its Dictionary of the Ecumenical Movement (5) which identifies seventeen distinct theologies including African theology, Asian theology, Black theology, Feminist theology, Womanist theology.
Womanist theology is distinguished from feminist theology in its primary concern with the effects and expressions of global racism and economic disadvantage among African American, African, and other poor women of color.
James Cone, and a brief summary of womanist theology that mentions Renita Weems, Jacquelyn Grant, Kelly Brown Douglas, and Delores Williams.
See Rufus Burow, "Enter Womanist Theology and Ethics," The Western Journal of Black Studies 22, no.
First is Thomas' own essay on womanist theology and epistemology (that is, the nature of knowledge).