Woman's Christian Temperance Union

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Related to Women's Christian Temperance Union: Anti Saloon League
1.An association of women formed in the United States in 1874, for the advancement of temperance by organizing preventive, educational, evangelistic, social, and legal work. It is also known as the Women's Christian Temperance Union and by its acronym WCTU or W.C.T.U.. It was one of the political forces leading to passage of the constitutional amendment, later repealed, which prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages.
References in periodicals archive ?
It began with the Women's Christian Temperance Union who believed that alcohol was destroying families and leaving women and children abused and penniless.
Beginning as a social movement spearheaded by the Women's Christian Temperance Union, the role of women within the profession eventually progressed from simple "matrons" to prominent roles of power.
These items include a remarkable replica of an early petition organized by the Women's Christian Temperance Union for equal votes for women that the sponsors presented to the Manitoba government in 1894.
Suffragists helped establish organizations such as the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and the National Purity Association, which led the fights to push men out of saloons and women out of brothels.
She found comfort in her work with the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the Suffrage Movement.
A committed suffragist, she was a founder of Manitoba's Equal Franchise Association in 1894 and president of the local Women's Christian Temperance Union.
But anti-alcohol zealots like the Women's Christian Temperance Union or the Anti-Saloon League acclaimed it as victory for what they labelled the Noble Experiment.
Allied with the Women's Christian Temperance Union (led by Frances Willard), NAWSA drew away from the notions of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, with her critique of the Bible and associations with Freethinkers.
For this was a time when alcohol was drunK instead of polluted water and it caused such casual drunKenness among men and children in rural 19th century America, that it inspired the launch of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, which had, as its symbol, a hatchet striKing an apple tree.
Chellis's "useful labors" included writing at least fifty books and innumerable articles on temperance, the leading reform movement of the nineteenth century (Tompkins 200), as well as participating in the local chapter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union (wcru).
The Women's Christian Temperance Union, a key player in passing Prohibition, was founded in Hillsboro, OH in 1873.
As Collier-Thomas notes, African-American women's groups often leveraged their power by joining and forming coalitions with groups representing White women and other Christians, including the Women's Christian Temperance Union, Church Women United and the Young Women's Christian Association, where Height did some of her early work on race relations.

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