horntail

(redirected from Wood wasps)

horn·tail

 (hôrn′tāl′)
n.
Any of various sawflies of the family Siricidae, having a spine at the end of the abdomen and, in the female, a long stout ovipositor.

horntail

(ˈhɔːnˌteɪl)
n
(Animals) any of various large wasplike insects of the hymenopterous family Siricidae, the females of which have a strong stout ovipositor and lay their eggs in the wood of felled trees. Also called: wood wasp

horn•tail

(ˈhɔrnˌteɪl)

n.
any of various wasplike insects of the family Siricidae, the females of which have a hornlike ovipositor.
[1880–85]
References in periodicals archive ?
In their respective native ranges, Sirex wood wasps rarely attack healthy vigorous trees and often develop in trees that previously were stressed or injured (Hall 1968; Coyle et al.
Potential threats resulting from the establishment of the non-native species in the Southeast include ecological and economic damage to both commercial and unmanaged pine forests, and the possible displacement of native wood wasps (Gandhi & Herms 2010; Ryan et al.
noctilio to evaluate the potential for interactions among the native and invasive wood wasps, as well as other pine-inhabiting insects.
from tornadoes, ice storms) were included to ensure capture of wood wasps as we anticipated that these sites comprised favorable habitat.
each collection day wood wasp count was divided by the total number of wood wasps captured in each trap, at each site, for each year).
The female wood wasps of the Siricidae family use a needle-like ovipositor to deposit eggs inside pine trees.
And now, researchers including Rodriguez y Baena is trying to create a medical probe based on the same mechanism used by wood wasps.
LOGS can be piled up to provide shelter for wildlife such as spiders, beetles, wood wasps, solitary bees, slugs and snails, which will attract birds, who will pick over the pile in search of a meal.
Experts called in to examine the nest at a housing estate in Ballyhooly, Cork, said the insects were harmless Scandinavian wood wasps - and not a swarm of dangerous hornets.
Dr Ken Bond of University College Cork said wood wasps were often up to 10 times bigger than normal wasps.
When found it was suspected the wood wasps were their more aggressive cousins - the hornet
YOU BEE-AUTY: Wood wasp the Dempseys found near their home in Mitchelstown, Cork; TALL TAIL: Ryan & Josh Dempsey yesterday