woodland

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Wood·land

 (wo͝od′lənd, -lănd′)
adj.
Of or relating to a Native American culture prevalent throughout much of eastern North America beginning around 1000 bc and lasting especially in northeastern regions until contact with Europeans, characterized by increasing reliance on settled agriculture, by the development of Neolithic crafts and tools, and in certain areas by the building of ceremonial mounds.

[From the woodland regions in which the culture flourished.]

wood·land

 (wo͝od′lənd, -lănd′)
n.
Land covered with trees.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or constituting woodland.
2. Living, growing, or present in woodland: woodland flowers.

wood′land·er (-lən-dər) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

woodland

(ˈwʊdlənd)
n
(Forestry)
a. land that is mostly covered with woods or dense growths of trees and shrubs
b. (as modifier): woodland fauna.
ˈwoodlander n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wood•land

(n. ˈwʊdˌlænd, -lənd; adj. -lənd)

n.
1. land covered with woods or trees.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or inhabiting the woods; sylvan: a woodland nymph.
[before 900]
wood′land•er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.woodland - land that is covered with trees and shrubswoodland - land that is covered with trees and shrubs
biome - a major biotic community characterized by the dominant forms of plant life and the prevailing climate
greenwood - woodlands in full leaf; "the greenwood was Robin Hood's home"
dry land, ground, solid ground, terra firma, earth, land - the solid part of the earth's surface; "the plane turned away from the sea and moved back over land"; "the earth shook for several minutes"; "he dropped the logs on the ground"
riparian forest - woodlands along the banks of stream or river
silva, sylva - the forest trees growing in a country or region
tree farm - a forest (or part of a forest) where trees are grown for commercial use
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

woodland

noun forest, trees, woods, wood the strip of woodland which bordered the stream
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
أرْض مُشَجَّرَه، غابَه
skovområde
metsämetsämaa
erdeierdőserdős vidékerdőség
skóglendi
ormanlık bölge

woodland

[ˈwʊdlənd]
A. Nbosque m
B. CPDde los bosques
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

woodland

[ˈwʊdlənd] nzone f boisée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

woodland

[ˈwʊdlənd]
1. nzona boscosa
2. adjdi bosco, silvestre
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

wood

(wud) noun
1. (also adjective) (of) the material of which the trunk and branches of trees are composed. My desk is (made of) wood; She gathered some wood for the fire; I like the smell of a wood fire.
2. (often in plural) a group of growing trees. They went for a walk in the woods.
3. a golf-club whose head is made of wood.
ˈwooded adjective
(of land) covered with trees. a wooded hillside.
ˈwooden adjective
made of wood. three wooden chairs.
ˈwoody adjective
1. covered with trees. woody countryside.
2. (of a smell etc) of or like wood.
ˈwood carving noun
the art of carving wood.
ˈwoodcut noun
a print made by pressing a block of wood with design cut on it onto paper.
ˈwoodcutter noun
a person whose job is felling trees.
ˈwoodland noun
land covered with woods. a stretch of woodland.
ˈwoodlouseplural ˈwoodlice noun
a tiny creature with a jointed shell, found under stones etc.
ˈwoodpecker noun
a type of bird which pecks holes in the bark of trees, searching for insects.
ˈwood pulp noun
pulp from wood that can be used for making paper.
ˈwoodwind (-wind) noun
(in an orchestra, the group of people who play) wind instruments made of wood.
ˈwoodwork noun
1. the art of making things from wood; carpentry. He did woodwork at school.
2. the wooden part of any structure. The woodwork in the house is rotting.
ˈwoodwormplurals ˈwoodworm, ~woodworms noun
the larva of a certain type of beetle, which bores into wood and destroys it.
out of the wood(s)
out of danger.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
When a new-hatched savage running wild about his native woodlands in a grass clout, followed by the nibbling goats, as if he were a green sapling; even then, in Queequeg's ambitious soul, lurked a strong desire to see something more of Christendom than a specimen whaler or two.
Their unrestrained laughter filling the hot, fern-clad ravine had a soulless limpidity, as of wild, inhuman dwellers in tropical woodlands. Following the example of certain prudent travellers, I withdrew unseen - and returned, not much wiser, to the Mediterranean, the sea of classic adventures.
Here were different sights from what one saw in the forest; hedgerows, broad fields of barley corn, pasture lands rolling upward till they met the sky and all dotted over with flocks of white sheep, hayfields whence came the odor of new-mown hay that lay in smooth swathes over which skimmed the swifts in rapid flight; such they saw, and different was it, I wot, from the tangled depths of the sweet woodlands, but full as fair.
The skies they were ashen and sober; The leaves they were crisped and sere -- The leaves they were withering and sere; It was night in the lonesome October Of my most immemorial year: It was hard by the dim lake of Auber, In the misty mid region of Weir: -- It was down by the dank tarn of Auber, In the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.
She was really a little gold-haired blue-eyed dryad, whose true home was a wild white cherry-tree that grew in some scattered woodland behind the old country-house of my boyhood.
Lured by the flowers and the shade and charmed by the songs of birds which invited to woodland paths and green fields, his imagination fired by glimpses of golden domes and glittering palaces in the distance on either hand, the Young Politician said:
Here they were lured aside and to the north to pretty Woodland, where Billy drove team for a fruit farm, and where Saxon wrung from him a reluctant consent for her to work a few days in the fruit harvest.
She had discovered that a lane opened out below the apple orchard and ran up through a belt of woodland; and she had explored it to its furthest end in all its delicious vagaries of brook and bridge, fir coppice and wild cherry arch, corners thick with fern, and branching byways of maple and mountain ash.
But it is to be doubted whether any one liked reading them so much as he liked writing them--say, some time in the years 1893 and 1894, in a New York flat, where he could look from his lofty windows over two miles and a half of woodland in Central Park, and halloo his fancy wherever he chose in that faery realm of books which he re-entered in reminiscences perhaps too fond at times, and perhaps always too eager for the reader's following.
Everywhere we have an open woodland, the ground being partially covered with a very thin pasture, with little appearance of verdure.
He took his hat off his hot head and lay propped on his elbow in the lush, feathery, woodland grass.
And now vegetation matured with vigour; Lowood shook loose its tresses; it became all green, all flowery; its great elm, ash, and oak skeletons were restored to majestic life; woodland plants sprang up profusely in its recesses; unnumbered varieties of moss filled its hollows, and it made a strange ground-sunshine out of the wealth of its wild primrose plants: I have seen their pale gold gleam in overshadowed spots like scatterings of the sweetest lustre.