Woollcott


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Woollcott

(ˈwʊlkɒt)
n
(Biography) Alexander. 1887–1943, US writer and critic. His collected essays include Shouts and Murmurs (1922)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Woollcott - United States drama critic and journalist (1887-1943)Woollcott - United States drama critic and journalist (1887-1943)
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Joe Woollcott, community fundraising manager for Brain Tumour Research in Scotland, said: "We would like to thank Mollie and Andrew for their abseil challenge to support Brain Tumour Research.
1 " Joe Woollcott, community fundraising manager for Brain Tumour Research in Scotland, said: "We are extremely grateful to Craig and everyone who is taking part in the Goat Fell hike for raising awareness and vital funds for research."
Declan Walker and Ryan Woollcott levelled before Ashley Ruane pounced for the winner five minutes into injury time.
Adams ("F.P.A."), drama critic Alexander Woollcott, illustrator Cyrus Leroy Baldridge, and above all the daily's editor, Harold Ross, founder of the New Yorker.
In 1942, Waugh published it with a dedication to Alexander Woollcott, noting that "the world in which and for which it was designed, has ceased to exist." After the war he revised it for publication with "Other Stories Written Before the Second World War" in the Uniform Edition of his work.
On my voyage from Oban to Skye and the Small Isles, however, skipper Ian Woollcott also made life comfortable for the passengers by staying in sheltered waters whenever he could, and judging the right moment to pass Ardnamurchan Point, the most westerly piece of the British mainland.
(6) Added Alexander Woollcott, the esteemed critic, '"The Seventh Heart' is, I am told, one of the most feeble and paltry attempts at play writing ever tenderly exhibited in this city." (7)
(5) Critic Alexander Woollcott described it as "a tragic and unforgettable play ...
By 1928, Warde was living on Crosby Gaige's Watch Hill Farm (an occasional getaway for celebrities like George Gershwin, Harpo Marx, and Alexander Woollcott) and designing books for Watch Hill Press.
In 1935, sponsor Cream of Wheat had canceled cultural commentator Alexander Woollcott's program The Town Crier after Woollcott criticized Adolph Hitler (35).