Woolwich


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Wool•wich

(ˈwʊl ɪdʒ, -ɪtʃ)

n.
a former borough of Greater London, England, now part of Greenwich and Newham.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Young Woolwich's knife, in particular, which is of the oyster kind, with the additional feature of a strong shutting-up movement which frequently balks the appetite of that young musician, is mentioned as having gone in various hands the complete round of foreign service.
These were the guns that were brought up from Woolwich and Chatham to cover Kingston.
The docks down the river, abreast of Woolwich, are imposing by their proportions and the vast scale of the ugliness that forms their surroundings - ugliness so picturesque as to become a delight to the eye.
We saw Tilbury Fort and remembered the Spanish Armada, Gravesend, Woolwich, and Greenwich-- places which I had heard of even in my country.
No situation would be beneath him; or what did Sir Thomas think of Woolwich? or how could a boy be sent out to the East?
"I dined at the Carlton with Bellairs and some men from Woolwich and we had a box at the Empire to see the new ballet.
"To think," he muttered, "that we've two hundred men spread out at Tyneside, Woolwich and Portsmouth, and not one of them go on to this!
That's what puzzles me; for I know there ain't more coals in her than would take her to about Woolwich and back.
Besides the notices on the gates of the Fleet and the King's Bench, many similar announcements were left, before one o'clock at noon, at the houses of private individuals; and further, the mob proclaimed their intention of seizing on the Bank, the Mint, the Arsenal at Woolwich, and the Royal Palaces.
Do you think, sir, you can have Woolwich Warren in the midst of a wilderness, three thousand miles from Great Britain?"
Henson, the projector of the late unsuccessful flying machine - with two seamen from Woolwich - in all, eight persons.
Indulging in these solemn speculations, and thinking about his debts, and his son Jim at College, and Frank at Woolwich, and the four girls, who were no beauties, poor things, and would not have a penny but what they got from the aunt's expected legacy, the Rector and his lady walked on for a while.