wootz

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wootz

 (wo͞ots)
n.
A hard, high-carbon steel developed in India around 300 bc, used in the production of Damascus steel.

[Probably from a misreading of an English transcription of Kannada ukku, urku, steel; akin to Tamil uruku, to melt and urukku, melted thing, steel.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wootz

(wuːts)
n
(Metallurgy) a type of crucible steel developed in India
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
While the metal was created from wootz steel from India, the actual fabrication process for Damascus steel, much like its fictional counterpart, has been lost over time.
The Introduction highlights some major achievements of ancient Indian metallurgy: extraction of pure metallic zinc on a commercial scale by the 12th/13th century CE; the rust-free Delhi iron pillar of the 4th-5th century CE, weighing about 6 metric tons; the second millennium BCE "Copper Hoards" of the upper Ganga valley; the swords made of the famous wootz steel; and the excellent reputation which Indian iron enjoyed internationally before the onset of the modern industrial revolution.
The making of hand-forged Damascus steel originated from techniques used in 300100 BC India and Sri Lanka, where it was referred to as Wootz steel. Simply explained, Damascus is forged by mixing two steels of different carbon content.
There are at least three metallurgical ways to understand these liquid treatments of iron blades: the quenching of the iron (which imparts hardness to iron that has been effectively carburized [i.e., made into a low-carbon steel] by the smith as part of his working the iron at the forge); the pickling of an iron implement with some kind of caustic solution to clean and recondition it for use; and the etching of a blade with a reagent that, particularly with blades made of Indian wootz steel (see, below, the discussion of [acute{s}]aikya/saikya, may bring out striking moir[acute{ e}] patterns based on the varying crystalline structure of the underlying metal.
For reasons that I will make clear shortly, this steel was probably closely related to the wootz steel of modem south India, the steel formerly shipped west to Damascus and on which damask or damascene steel was based.
This word describes wootz steel accurately since it was made by fusion.