Wordsworth


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Words·worth

 (wûrdz′wûrth′), William 1770-1850.
British poet whose most important collection, Lyrical Ballads (1798), published jointly with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped establish romanticism in England. He was appointed poet laureate in 1843.

Words·worth′i·an adj.

Wordsworth

(ˈwɜːdzˌwəθ)
n
1. (Biography) Dorothy. 1771–1855, English writer, whose Journals are noted esp for their descriptions of nature
2. (Biography) her brother, William. 1770–1850, English poet, whose work, celebrating nature, was greatly inspired by the Lake District, in which he spent most of his life. Lyrical Ballads (1798), to which Coleridge contributed, is often taken as the first example of English romantic poetry and includes his Lines Written above Tintern Abbey. Among his other works are The Prelude (completed in 1805; revised thereafter and published posthumously) and Poems in Two Volumes (1807), which includes The Solitary Reaper and Intimations of Immortality
Wordsworthian adj, n

Words•worth

(ˈwɜrdzˌwɜrθ)

n.
1. Dorothy, 1771–1855, English writer.
2. her brother, William, 1770–1850, English poet: poet laureate 1843–50.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Wordsworth - a romantic English poet whose work was inspired by the Lake District where he spent most of his life (1770-1850)Wordsworth - a romantic English poet whose work was inspired by the Lake District where he spent most of his life (1770-1850)
lake poets - English poets at the beginning of the 19th century who lived in the Lake District and were inspired by it
References in classic literature ?
This man was William Wordsworth. He was the apostle of simplicity, the prophet of nature.
And yet, perhaps, strange as it may seem, there is no poet who makes less appeal to young minds than does Wordsworth.
"Aristotle, with singular assurance, has declared poetry the most philosophical of all writings*-but it required a Wordsworth to pronounce it the most metaphysical.
Yet Wordsworth and Coleridge are men in years; the one imbued in contemplation from his childhood; the other a giant in intellect and learning.
Besides these there were standard volumes of poetry, published by Phillips & Sampson, from worn- out plates; for a birthday present my mother got me Wordsworth in this shape, and I am glad to think that I once read the "Excursion" in it, for I do not think I could do so now, and I have a feeling that it is very right and fit to have read the "Excursion." To be honest, it was very hard reading even then, and I cannot truthfully pretend that I have ever liked Wordsworth except in parts, though for the matter of that, I do not suppose that any one ever did.
Still, I do not make out that Wordsworth was ever a passion of mine; on the other hand, neither was Byron.
But one cannot forget also that Lamb was early an enthusiastic admirer of Wordsworth: of Wordsworth, the first characteristic power of the nineteenth century, his essay on whom, in the Quarterly Review, Mr.
Wordsworth made a constant companion of a pet daisy.
"Well, now, Sir Humphry Davy; I dined with him years ago at Cartwright's, and Wordsworth was there too--the poet Wordsworth, you know.
Then we come to Wordsworth and Coleridge, Pope, Johnson, Addison, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats.
But the odes of Keats and of Wordsworth, a poem or two by Coleridge, a few more by Shelley, discovered vast realms of the spirit that none had explored before.
He said he could do the multiplication-table backward and paste sea-weed in a book; that he knew how many times the word "begat" occurred in the Old Testament; and could recite "The Boy Stood on the Burning Deck" and Wordsworth's "We Are Seven."