workaholic

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Related to Work addiction: workaholism

work·a·hol·ic

 (wûr′kə-hô′lĭk, -hŏl′ĭk)
n.
One who has a compulsive and unrelenting need to work.

work′a·hol′ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

workaholic

(ˌwɜːkəˈhɒlɪk)
n
(Psychology)
a. a person obsessively addicted to work
b. (as modifier): workaholic behaviour.
[C20: from work + -holic, coined in 1971 by Wayne Oates, US author]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

work•a•hol•ic

(ˌwɜrk əˈhɔ lɪk, -ˈhɒl ɪk)

n.
a person who works compulsively at the expense of other pursuits.
[1965–70; work + -aholic]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.workaholic - person with a compulsive need to workworkaholic - person with a compulsive need to work
portmanteau, portmanteau word, blend - a new word formed by joining two others and combining their meanings; "`smog' is a blend of `smoke' and `fog'"; "`motel' is a portmanteau word made by combining `motor' and `hotel'"; "`brunch' is a well-known portmanteau"
compulsive - a person with a compulsive disposition; someone who feels compelled to do certain things
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
workoholik
munkamániás
pracoholik

workaholic

[ˌwɜːkəˈhɒlɪk] Ntrabajador(a) m/f obsesivo/a, adicto/a m/f al trabajo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

workaholic

[ˌwɜːkəˈhɒlɪk] nbourreau m de travailwork area ncoin m travail
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

workaholic

n (inf)Arbeitswütige(r) mf, → Arbeitssüchtige(r) mf, → Arbeitstier nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

workaholic

[ˌwɜːkəˈhɒlɪk] nstacanovista m/f, maniaco/a del lavoro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
2010 Students Demographic data EAI South Oaks Gambling Screen-Revised Adolescent (SOGS-RA) Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS) Work Addiction Risk Test (WART) Internet Addiction Test (IAT) Warner & Griffiths 2006 Gym training Demographic data EAI Open-ended questions designed to explore the underlying themes of exercise behaviour Youngman et al.
Work addiction, unlike addictions involving alcohol or other substances, is rewarded by our culture with promotions, bonuses, praise, and awards - and therefore considered a good thing.
In contrast to engagement, workaholism (work addiction) is viewed as a pathology, characterized by a compulsive need for continued, excessive work.
The authors, therefore, investigated the association between life-balance domains and work addiction for African Americans.
Workaholism is not purely an American phenomenon; many other countries have also reported high rates of work addiction including the Netherlands, Israel, Belgium (Snir & Harpaz, 2006), Norway (Andreassen, Griffiths, Hetland, & Pallesen, 2012), Japan (Shimazu, Demerouti, Bakker, Shimada, & Kawakami, 2011; Snir & Harpaz, 2006), and Canada (Matuska, 2010), among others.
James Franco recently opened up about his work addiction and how it caught up with him last year.
Kolejna, znana i powszechnie stosowana metoda jest Kwestionariusz do Pomiaru Uzaleznienia od Pracy (Work Addiction Risk Test--WART), opracowany przez Robinsona [11].
The researchers used the Bergen Work Addiction Scale to identify workaholism among the subjects, which involved participants rating how often the following statements applied to them in the past year: You think about ways to free up more time for work, You spend significantly more time working than originally planned, You work to reduce feelings of guilt, anxiety, helplessness, or depression, Others have told you to work less but you don't listen to them, You become stressed if you are prevented from working, Work is prioritized before hobbies, leisure activities, and/or exercise, You work to the extent that it negatively impacts your health.
"During my years working, I got so sucked into my career and work addiction," Nadine says.
The penalty for working more than six days a week, that is, work addiction, was death by stoning.
Our aim in the current study was to single out individual difference variables that may be related to work addiction. We chose proactive personality, which indicates individuals' ability to actively change their work environment (Bateman & Crant, 1993; Seibert, Crant, & Kraimer, 1999), and locomotion, which involves individuals "moving" from state to state to regulate their behavior (Kruglanski et al., 2000).
This is followed by chapters on specific problem areas, including dysfunctional teams, sexual harassment, discrimination, work addiction, and workplace violence.