workerist

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workerist

(ˈwɜːkərɪst)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a supporter of working-class politics
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to a view of politics that emphasizes the importance of the working class
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
His more direct inspiration, however, is "Italian workerism." Rooted in twentieth-century efforts to understand the effects of Taylorism and other emerging forms of control in Italian factories, this tradition seeks to illuminate the experience of work from workers' own perspective and to reveal the basis for new forms of organization.
What this signified, according to Di Leo, was 'workerism in power' and a clear 'primacy of politics'.
(3) It emphasises principles of self-reliance and self-sufficiency; politically, in the past it was associated with 'workerism', the belief that the emancipation of the working class is a task which can only be accomplished by the organisations of the class itself, led by an 'organic' intelligentsia.
The party oscillated permanently between a kind of 'workerism' that exalted the worker as the repository of all virtues and a propensity for populism when it tried to address other demographic groups.
Commenting on the apparently benign strategies of the Italian information technology company Olivetti, which had been integrating innovation, social welfare, radical art and architecture into its factories and ethos from the 1930s, the chief theorist of Operaismo (workerism), Raniero Panzieri, remarked: 'Look at Olivetti, it is a feudal court with this vicious facade of intellectuals working on programs and research that are nothing but a masquerade of capitalism's will to integrate the whole of society.' (22) The use of culture was so powerful, in Panzieri's opinion, because it helped build collaboration between workers, producing the associations that mass production cut asunder.
A series of essays on just this problem written from the perspective of Italian workerism --a 1960s intellectual and social movement that sought to reconceptualise working-class struggle as a central agent in the dynamics of capitalist development --make this all too clear.
The UDF, Workerism and the Struggle for Radical Democracy in South Africa.
In Italy, socialist feminists drew upon the theory of operaismo, or workerism, which had developed in the Italian trade union movement.
Material considerations such as this help to challenge the dichotomy between 'lifestylism' and 'workerism', and an attempt to balance mutual criticisms is a central thread.
"Learning to Struggle: My Story Between Workerism and Feminism." Viewpoint Magazine 3: Workers' Inquiry (2013).
Also, his large-scale mobilization of workers to replenish the ranks of the intelligentsia did not turn Stalin into a late convert to workerism. The formation of the new intelligentsia from below was essentially a one-time event.