workerist

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workerist

(ˈwɜːkərɪst)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a supporter of working-class politics
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) of or relating to a view of politics that emphasizes the importance of the working class
References in periodicals archive ?
A series of essays on just this problem written from the perspective of Italian workerism --a 1960s intellectual and social movement that sought to reconceptualise working-class struggle as a central agent in the dynamics of capitalist development --make this all too clear.
The UDF, Workerism and the Struggle for Radical Democracy in South Africa.
In Italy, socialist feminists drew upon the theory of operaismo, or workerism, which had developed in the Italian trade union movement.
Learning to Struggle: My Story Between Workerism and Feminism.
102) At that point workerism once again became a threat.
Negri argues that the two key post-war contributions to an Italian political ontology, the workerism of Tronti and the feminism of Muraro, start from the identification of the principal forms of exploitation, capitalism and patriarchy, to develop a potent thinking of singularity and creative difference.
Murray Bookchin discards the syndicalist strategy as narrow economism [2], and while it is true that the syndicalist movement has in fact often been guilty of "cultural workerism," productivism and the idealization of the working class and its role in society, especially in the past, this has been widely challenged in and by the movement itself, and is only a secondary tendency now.
The autonomist futurist glance, then, is neither passive nor isolated: technological hope is a function of a "pragmatic and militant" workerism that denies "the Fordist rationalization of work" through mass strikes and migration--a positive, dynamic response dependent on grand scale solidarity (Lotringer 9).
The student uprisings highlighted the decline of workerism, productivism and hierarchical, centralized party politics.
He goes on to say that, in the West, while the revolutionaries who 'adopted' the working class more dispassionately managed to build workers' parties that were influential for a time, those whose workerism was expressed too passionately usually succeeded only in alienating potential supporters and therefore never evolved much beyond the status of sects (228).
The shared motif across such arguments was a common workerism.